Africa News blog

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Does the “billionth African” mean boon or burden?

October 22, 2009

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

One day this year, in all probability, the “billionth African” will have been born, a milestone that will only benefit the poorest continent if it can get its act together and unify its piecemeal markets.
   Nobody knows, of course, when or where in its 53 countries the child arrived to push Africa’s population into ten figures.
   The U.N. merely estimates that in mid-2008 there were 987 million people, and in mid-2009, 1,010 million.
   Given the difficulties of obtaining accurate data from the likes of Nigeria, where provincial population figures are often hostage to the ambitions of local politicians, or any data at all from the likes of Somalia, experts are reluctant to hazard any greater degree of accuracy.
   There is less doubt, however, about the underlying trend — that Africa’s population is set to grow faster than in any other part of the world in the coming decades, and to double by 2050.
   To some, the statistics from the U.N.’s population division will invite comparisons to the Asian giants, and inspire hopes of a flood of investment from Africans and outsiders to meet the needs of a continent likely to be home to one in five people by the middle of this century.
   By contrast, China’s projected population of 1.4 billion in 40 years will be shrinking, while India will only be adding an annual 3 million to its 1.6 billion people.
   To others, the numbers are stark reminders of the mammoth task Africa’s leaders face in providing the food, jobs, schools, housing and healthcare that are still so sorely lacking.
   UNFPA, the U.N.’s population arm, summarises by saying that sub-Saharan Africa faces “serious political, economic and social challenges” and points to the last two decades as evidence that more people does not mean more wealth.
   “Twenty years of almost three percent annual population growth has outpaced economic gains, leaving Africans, on average, 22 percent poorer than they were in the mid-1970s,” it says.
    Are Africa’s leaders ready and willing to create the truly unified common market needed to boost investment, trade and economic growth, or are short-term national interests likely to prevail, consigning Africa to a century of overpopulated poverty?

Comments

I am cofounder of 34 Million Friends of the United Nations Population Fund, a grassroots movement for the women of the world through UNFPA. As their guest I was in Mali and Senegal in 2003. It was fairly obvious that there were great numbers of families with little access to family planning which to me is a great tragedy. There is severe hunger in Africa right now and it will be the continent suffering the most from climate change. I would hope that African countries and the developed world would put adequate resources into empowering women with education and reproductive health including of course family planning. People might want to look up http://www.34millionfriends.org. A good portion of our $4 million has gone for family planning.

 

We celebrate the 1 billionth African.

I have seen 17 African countries so far and many are doing better than when I first visited them 5 years ago.

The last thing Africa needs is more Westerners imposing population control on them.

Posted by Joseph Meaney | Report as abusive
 

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