Global Economics Correpondent
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Oct 21, 2012

Fork in the road as U.S. outstrips Europe

LONDON (Reuters) – Slowly but surely, the global economy is witnessing a modest parting of the ways as the United States pulls ahead of a euro zone still shell-shocked by its debt and banking crisis.

To be sure, a slew of reports this week will show neither America nor Europe in great shape.

Oct 18, 2012

Analysis: Italian firms fight to hold head above political water

BOLOGNA, Italy (Reuters) – It’s not long into a chat with an Italian businessmen before talk turns to how a costly state is sucking the air out of Europe’s third-largest economy, endangering the euro along the way.

“In the end we’re asking for only one thing: a normal government for a normal country,” said Maurizio Marchesini, the president of Confindustria, Italy’s main employers’ association, in the wealthy north-central region of Emilia-Romagna.

Oct 18, 2012

Necessity is mother of financial invention in Italy

BOLOGNA, Italy, Oct 18 (Reuters) – Companies, banks and
local authorities are seeking innovative ways to help family
firms in Italy’s Emilia-Romagna to survive a credit crunch
brought on by the euro zone debt crisis.

The search for solutions, which include partial loan
guarantees and steps to bolster the creditworthiness of small
suppliers, reflects historically strong community links in the
region of north-central Italy.

Oct 10, 2012

Analysis: Revival of Britain’s northeast tests government

WILTON, England (Reuters) – Tracts of bare ground dot the vast Wilton chemical complex, a reminder of long-demolished plants that bear ghostly witness to the industrial decline of the world’s first manufacturing nation.

Just over 20 years ago, 12,000 people worked at Wilton on the banks of the River Tees in northeast England. Today, 4,000 remain. Back in 1862, Prime Minister William Gladstone marveled at the might of next-door Middlesbrough, calling it the ‘infant Hercules’. The iron, steel, shipbuilding and mining industries of the northeast are now a shadow of what they once were.

Oct 3, 2012

China’s currency foray augurs geopolitical strains

BAHRAIN (Reuters) – “It’s our currency and your problem,” U.S. Treasury Secretary John Connally famously said of the dollar in 1971.

More than 40 years later, China is doing something about it.

Fed up with what it sees as Washington’s malign neglect of the dollar, China is busily promoting the cross-border use of its own currency, the yuan, also known as the renminbi, in trade and investment.

Oct 3, 2012

Analysis: China’s currency foray augurs geopolitical strains

BAHRAIN (Reuters) – “It’s our currency and your problem,” U.S. Treasury Secretary John Connally famously said of the dollar in 1971.

More than 40 years later, China is doing something about it.

Fed up with what it sees as Washington’s malign neglect of the dollar, China is busily promoting the cross-border use of its own currency, the yuan, also known as the renminbi, in trade and investment.

Sep 30, 2012

Global Economy – A new quarter’s dark clouds and silver linings

LONDON (Reuters) – The darkest hour is just before dawn, the old saying goes. Of course, that’s also when your house is most likely to get burgled.

The same mix of new hopes and old fears defines the global economy heading into the fourth quarter.

Sep 30, 2012

A new quarter’s dark clouds and silver linings

LONDON, Sept 30 (Reuters) – The darkest hour is just before
dawn, the old saying goes. Of course, that’s also when your
house is most likely to get burgled.

The same mix of new hopes and old fears defines the global
economy heading into the fourth quarter.

Sep 19, 2012

U.S. meltdowns: History lessons for the euro

LONDON (Reuters) – In the early 1870s, property prices in Vienna, Berlin and Paris soared on the back of a state-promoted building boom fuelled by easy credit extended against the collateral of unbuilt or unfinished houses.

The crash that followed parallels what has happened more recently and may, with other lessons from U.S. history, provide pointers for the euro zone crisis.

Sep 19, 2012

Analysis: U.S. meltdowns – History lessons for the euro

LONDON (Reuters) – In the early 1870s, property prices in Vienna, Berlin and Paris soared on the back of a state-promoted building boom fuelled by easy credit extended against the collateral of unbuilt or unfinished houses.

The crash that followed parallels what has happened more recently and may, with other lessons from U.S. history, provide pointers for the euro zone crisis.

    • About Alan

      "I'm the Global Economics Correspondent for Reuters News based in London. I've reported from more than 40 countries over 30 years and have had postings in Frankfurt, New York, Washington, Paris, London, Tokyo, Singapore and Beijing. From the Plaza Accord to the creation of the euro and the rise of China, I'm lucky to have covered many of the big economic stories of recent years."
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