Global Economics Correpondent
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Aug 18, 2013

Fed minutes, euro zone surveys to point the way

LONDON (Reuters) – A blend of past and present holds the key this week to gauging global economic prospects.

Month-old minutes from the Federal Reserve could offer hints on when the U.S. central bank will scale back its extraordinary stimulus and up-to-date sentiment indicators will help track momentum in the reviving euro zone.

Aug 16, 2013

One swallow doesn’t make a summer for euro zone

LONDON (Reuters) – The cheery freeze frame of the euro zone economy last quarter is no guarantee of a happy ending to what has been a horror movie for most of the single currency bloc since the onset of the great financial crisis.

The return to growth, albeit of just 0.3 percent between the first and second quarters, is unalloyed good news for Europe and the world after 18 months of contraction.

Aug 15, 2013

Analysis: One swallow doesn’t make a summer for euro zone

LONDON (Reuters) – The cheery freeze frame of the euro zone economy last quarter is no guarantee of a happy ending to what has been a horror movie for most of the single currency bloc since the onset of the great financial crisis.

The return to growth, albeit of just 0.3 percent between the first and second quarters, is unalloyed good news for Europe and the world after 18 months of contraction.

Aug 4, 2013

Cross currents to slow but not halt Chinese growth

LONDON, Aug 4 (Reuters) – China’s monthly data deluge is
likely to confirm that the world’s second-largest economy is
still moving down through the gears but is not about to come to
a screeching halt.

Beijing is walking a fine line.

The leadership has underlined its determination to hit this
year’s 7.5 percent growth goal by fine-tuning polices to help
industries work more efficiently. But it is willing to accept
some slowdown to wean the economy off credit-driven investment.

Jul 31, 2013

Analysis: Population trends cloud Europe’s post-recession outlook

LONDON (Reuters) – Slowly but unsurely, Europe is facing up to population trends that will sap long-run economic growth and force nations to choose between cutting pensions and welfare benefits or paying higher taxes to maintain them.

Some countries are getting an early taste of difficulties that await Europe as the continent’s baby boomers retire and, because of flagging fertility rates, the average age of those left in the labor force rises.

Jul 28, 2013

Reading the runes in Washington and Frankfurt

LONDON (Reuters) – Three of the world’s leading central banks are likely to reaffirm their determination this week to keep a lid on interest rates for a long time to come, despite signs that their economies are slowly on the mend.

The Federal Reserve, the European Central Bank and the Bank of England are all expected to repeat or refine their “forward guidance” that borrowing costs will remain extraordinarily low as long as growth is sub-par and inflation is not a threat.

Jul 23, 2013

Analysis: What about the workers … and their share of income?

LONDON (Reuters)- Nothing lasts forever but a global trend that set in 30 years ago shows no sign of ending: a steep rise in the share of income that goes to profits and a corresponding decline in labor’s slice of the economic pie.

The imbalance, which is driven by technical change, the waning clout of unions and the rise of financial markets, raises issues that are primarily political.

Jul 21, 2013

Europe still sleeping even as Japan, Britain stir

LONDON, July 21 (Reuters) – Another month, another listless
set of business surveys is likely to show this week just how
much the euro zone economy still has to do to get over its
debilitating debt and banking crisis.

An index based on a poll of purchasing managers across the
17-country bloc probably edged up to 49.1 in July from 48.7 in
June, but remained below the watershed of 50 that would signal a
resumption of growth, according to economists polled by Reuters.

Jul 14, 2013

Global Economy – Fear of Fed and China slowdown take a toll

LONDON (Reuters) – Emerging economies that have thrived on ultra-loose U.S. monetary policy and insatiable Chinese demand for natural resources are in for another rude wake-up call this week.

The twin tailwinds are not turning into outright headwinds. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke will explain – yet again – in two days of congressional testimony that his plan to buy fewer bonds is not the same as raising interest rates.

Jul 14, 2013

Fear of Fed and China slowdown take a toll

LONDON (Reuters) – Emerging economies that have thrived on ultra-loose U.S. monetary policy and insatiable Chinese demand for natural resources are in for another rude wake-up call this week.

The twin tailwinds are not turning into outright headwinds. Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke will explain – yet again – in two days of congressional testimony that his plan to buy fewer bonds is not the same as raising interest rates.

    • About Alan

      "I'm the Global Economics Correspondent for Reuters News based in London. I've reported from more than 40 countries over 30 years and have had postings in Frankfurt, New York, Washington, Paris, London, Tokyo, Singapore and Beijing. From the Plaza Accord to the creation of the euro and the rise of China, I'm lucky to have covered many of the big economic stories of recent years."
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