Correspondent, Toronto, Canada
Alastair's Feed
Sep 23, 2013
Sep 23, 2013
Sep 23, 2013

Fairfax sets floor for BlackBerry with $4.7 billion offer

TORONTO (Reuters) – Struggling smartphone maker BlackBerry on Monday signed a tentative deal to be acquired by a consortium led by its biggest shareholder, setting a $4.7 billion floor in the auction of the Canadian company that invented on-the-go email.

The consortium is led by Fairfax Financial Holdings Ltd, a property and casualty insurer run by Canadian investor Prem Watsa. It has offered $9 a share in cash for BlackBerry, which last week said it expected to report a quarterly loss of nearly $1 billion.

Sep 23, 2013
Sep 23, 2013
Sep 23, 2013

BlackBerry move away from consumers unlikely to stem decline

TORONTO (Reuters) – BlackBerry Ltd’s plan to retreat from the consumer market in favor of its traditional strength serving businesses and governments is widely seen as a desperate move that industry watchers warn will only accelerate its downward spiral.

The strategic shift and dramatic restructuring are fueling fears about BlackBerry’s long-term viability. The uncertainty created could easily push a growing number of its telecom partners, business customers and consumers to abandon the platform.

Sep 20, 2013
Sep 19, 2013

Sprint, T-Mobile join Verizon in snub of Canada airwaves

TORONTO/NEW YORK (Reuters) – Sprint Corp and T-Mobile US Inc confirmed on Thursday they will not participate in Canada’s upcoming auction of prized wireless spectrum, joining larger rival Verizon Communications Inc in shunning the market.

The decision by the big U.S. wireless operators helped lift shares of BCE Inc, Rogers Communications Inc, and Telus Corp, which together control about 90 percent of the Canadian mobile market.

Sep 19, 2013

Analysis: Canadian cable TV’s ‘a la carte’ menu begins to take hold

NEW YORK/TORONTO (Reuters) – A transformation in how some Canadian cable TV companies sell channels to consumers might be a sign of things to come in the much bigger U.S. market.

With “a la carte” pricing, cable companies are offering Canadians an alternative to “take-it-or-leave-it” bundles that effectively force viewers there – and in the United States – to pay for channels that they do not watch in order to get access to those they do.

Sep 19, 2013

Canadian cable TV’s ‘a la carte’ menu begins to take hold

NEW YORK/TORONTO, Sept 19 (Reuters) – A transformation in
how some Canadian cable TV companies sell channels to consumers
might be a sign of things to come in the much bigger U.S.
market.

With “a la carte” pricing, cable companies are offering
Canadians an alternative to “take-it-or-leave-it” bundles that
effectively force viewers there – and in the United States – to
pay for channels that they do not watch in order to get access
to those they do.

    • About Alastair

      "Canada tech, media and telecoms reporter based in Toronto, with emphasis on Research In Motion and including coverage of Rogers, Bell Canada, Telus, the new mobile entrants and the tech companies filling in the gaps. Previously spent two years in Cairo bureau chasing Orascom Telecom's Naguib Sawiris. Prior to that, spent a year learning the ropes in London."
      Hometown:
      Melbourne, Australia
      Joined Reuters:
      2007
      Languages:
      English, Arabic
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