Alison Frankel

Countrywide MBS investors emerge from shadows as deadline looms

By Alison Frankel
August 30, 2011

Last October, when BofA’s proposed $8.5 billion settlement of Countrywide mortgage-backed securities breach of contract claims was just a twinkle in Kathy Patrick’s eye, David Grais of Grais & Ellsworth told me that one of the biggest problems for lawyers representing disgruntled MBS noteholders was the investors’ reluctance to come forward. Noteholders were afraid to provoke the banks that issued mortgage-backed securities, Grais said, so they didn’t want to sue under their own names. That’s why one of Grais & Ellsworth’s early put-back cases was filed on behalf of an ad hoc coalition of anonymous Countrywide MBS investors operating under the name Walnut Place.

11th Circ. on prosecutorial misconduct: what does ‘or’ mean?

By Alison Frankel
August 29, 2011

The three judges who heard the Justice Department’s appeal in a case called United States v. Ali Shaygan knew full well how consequential their ruling would be. The government wanted the appellate court to overturn a Miami federal judge’s imposition of $602,000 in sanctions for the U.S. Attorney’s prosecution of Shaygan, a physician accused of illegally writing prescriptions for controlled substances. And as Judge Pryor wrote in the majority opinion in the case, the issues on appeal were profound: “They involve the sovereign immunity of the United States, the constitutional separation of powers, and the civil rights and professional reputations of two federal prosecutors.”

BofA MBS settlement shocker: Grais removes case to federal court

By Alison Frankel
August 26, 2011

There is never a dull moment in Bank of America’s attempt to resolve its Countrywide mortgage-backed securities liability. In a stunning move Friday, the law firm leading the fight against BofA’s proposed $8.5 billion settlement with Countrywide MBS noteholders removed the case from New York state supreme court to federal court. “The purpose of removal is to make sure that this proceeding is adjudicated in the proper forum,” Grais & Ellsworth wrote in a letter to lawyers for Bank of New York Mellon (the Countrywide MBS trustee) and for the big institutional investors who crafted the proposed settlement. “We believe in good faith that this proceeding is subject to federal jurisdiction as a mass action under the Class Action Fairness Act.” (Here’s the Grais & Ellsworth letter with the removal petition attached.)

Who will lead J&J hip replacement MDL?

By Alison Frankel
August 25, 2011

In the next day or two, W. Mark Lanier of the Lanier Law Firm will file a letter with Dallas federal judge Ed Kinkeade outlining the reasons why he should lead what Lanier believes will become a huge mass tort: the multidistrict litigation over DePuy’s Pinnacle hip replacements. More than 300 personal injury suits accusing the Johnson & Johnson unit of failing to warn patients about design defects in the best-selling product have been filed in federal courts around the country and consolidated before Judge Kinkeade. Lanier made a preemptive play to take charge of the MDL, proposing that he and a handful of other well-known mass tort veterans head up a broadly inclusive plaintiffs steering committee. But instead, in an August 10 order, Judge Kinkeade threw open the leadership contest with a call for plaintiffs firms to respond to a long list of questions about their experience in big cases.

2011: A Samsung litigation odyssey

By Alison Frankel
August 24, 2011

As all the world knows, Samsung is engaged in a do-or-die international patent battle with Apple. On Wednesday alone, Samsung saw a court in the Netherlands enjoin it from infringing an Apple smartphone patent; planned for an injunction hearing in Germany, where a court enjoined the Samsung Galaxy Tab, then lifted the preliminary injunction; and went before Judge Lucy Koh in San Jose federal court, where Apple is demanding yet another injunction barring Samsung devices.

Decoding Lloyd Blankfein’s retention of Reid Weingarten

By Alison Frankel
August 23, 2011
The market assumed the worst Monday after Reuters’ great scoop on Goldman Sachs CEO Lloyd Blankfein bringing in Reid Weingarten of Steptoe & Johnson to represent him in the Justice Department’s investigation of the bank. Goldman’s share price fell almost 5 percent on the fear that Weingarten’s entrance signals that DOJ is getting serious about its follow-up to the April 2011 Senate subcommittee report on the financial crisis. In one sense, that’s reading way too much into the mere fact that Blankfein has brought in his own lawyer. It’s standard operating procedure for corporate executives at companies under investigation to have separate counsel. Consider the example of other alleged villains of the financial meltdown. Richard Fuld of Lehman, Joseph Cassano of AIG, Angelo Mozilo and David Sambol of Countrywide, John Thain of Merrill Lynch, Kenneth Lewis of Bank of America: they all have their own lawyers, and none of them have faced any criminal charges. Only Mozilo and Sambol even had to answer to the SEC.
Lawyers who represent corporations — Sullivan & Cromwell, in Goldman’s case — have a duty to the company. And though CEOs and other high-ranking executives often think their interests are exactly the same as the corporation’s, lawyers have to anticipate a divergence between what’s good for the company and what’s good for its leaders. A company under investigation might be best served by cooperating with prosecutors and turning over (for instance) its lawyers’ interview notes; execs may have conflicting interests. Even if they don’t, lawyers are supposed to avoid even the appearance of a conflict, so as soon as it’s clear that investigators are interested even in just interviewing an individual executive, white-collar defense lawyers will typically advise bringing in separate counsel.

A couple of cases from the last few years drove home that lesson. Proskauer Rose represented Allen Stanford’s Stanford Financial as the Ponzi scheme collapsed. Proskauer partner Thomas Sjoblom was in the room with Stanford Financial’s chief investment officer, Laura Pendergest-Holt, when she was interviewed by the SEC in 2009. Sjoblom told the SEC that he was representing the company, not Pendergest-Holt. But she ended up indicted for lying to investigators and obstructing justice based on that SEC interview. Pendergest-Holt turned around and sued Sjoblom and Proskauer, asserting that she was never told the firm wasn’t representing her. Sjoblom subsequently resigned from Proskauer. (Proskauer’s spokesman didn’t return my call.)

Nortel IP sale will help Google win OK for Motorola bid

By Alison Frankel
August 18, 2011

Remember the Cold War military doctrine of Mutually Assured Destruction? The idea was that if the United States and the Soviet Union both knew the enemy had enough weapons to wipe the entire country off the map, neither would actually use those weapons. Mutually Assured Destruction got the entire world through the age of fallout shelters and Barry Goldwater. So the doctrine should be powerful enough to get Google, Apple and Microsoft past Justice Department antitrust regulators.

Blogger: Weitz & Luxenberg got $92.5 ml pot for Seroquel clients

By Alison Frankel
August 17, 2011

AstraZeneca’s approach to the 28,000-case litigation over its antipsychotic Seroquel has been notable for two things. First, the pharma company was incredibly successful in court. It won pre-trial dismissal of hundreds of state and federal suits blaming Seroquel for causing diabetes and more serious injuries and got a defense verdict in the one Seroquel case that made it to trial. Second, AZ has been notoriously secretive about settling the remaining cases. AZ reached private deals with plaintiffs firms that controlled big Seroquel dockets, offering token amounts of money to plaintiffs in exchange for their lawyers agreeing to drop out of the litigation. The company disclosed settlements in blocks, finally announcing in late July that it had reached agreements in principle to resolve all but 250 Seroquel suits for a total of $647 million — a small fraction of what plaintiffs lawyers once hoped they’d get.

Microsoft beats Google in Motorola fight

By Alison Frankel
August 16, 2011

Monday was mostly a good day for Google and Motorola. Unless you’re on vacation where there’s no Internet access, in which case you’re not reading this, you’re surely aware that Google announced its $12.5 billion acquisition of Motorola, which means that Google is picking up one of the best patent portfolios in wireless history — and supposedly had the pleasure of besting Microsoft in doing so. But the news wasn’t all good for Google and its new best friend, Motorola. Deep down in the patent litigation trenches at the U.S. International Trade Commission, Administrative Law Judge Theodore Essex denied Google’s high-profile, third-party motion for sanctions against Microsoft in Microsoft’s infringement suit against Motorola.

Google’s Motorola deal is good news for Quinn Emanuel

By Alison Frankel
August 15, 2011

There are all sorts of questions out there about Google’s $12.5 billion acquisition of Motorola Mobility. What will the deal mean for HTC and Samsung, the other cellphone makers using the Android platform? Will the merger force Microsoft to make a bid for Nokia? And is Carl Icahn, Motorola’s biggest shareholder, finally satisfied? I’ll leave it to others to ruminate on all that. I’m interested, as always, in what this deal means for lawyers.