Alison Frankel

Canada as litigation haven for U.S. shareholders? Not so fast…

By Alison Frankel
September 5, 2013

The high point, at least so far, of securities class action filings in Canada was in 2011, when, according to NERA Economic Consulting, shareholder lawyers filed 15 new class actions. In 2012, the number of new filings declined to nine. And unless there’s a surge in class action complaints in the next few months, 2013 will show a steep decline even from last year’s total, NERA’s Bradley Heys told me Thursday.

SCOTUS’s next big privacy issue: Can police seize smartphones?

By Alison Frankel
September 4, 2013

David Riley was already in deep trouble when the San Diego Police Department got hold of his Samsung smartphone in August 2009. Riley had been driving around the neighborhood in a Lexus with expired tags, and when he was pulled over police discovered that his license had been suspended. They searched his car and found guns hidden under the hood. Riley was arrested for carrying concealed and loaded weapons.

BP plays Twister in latest Deepwater Horizon appellate brief

By Alison Frankel
September 3, 2013

Last year, when BP agreed to a historic multibillion-dollar class action settlement with people and businesses harmed by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, the company pledged to defend the deal against objections and appeals. As is customary, lawyers for the claimants actually filed the motion to certify the settlement class, but BP told the court it fully supported the settlement agreement. The company and class counsel submitted joint expert declarations attesting to the fairness of the proposed deal, including a jointly filed report by Columbia Law School professor John Coffee, who said that although he’s skeptical of broad mass tort class actions, the agreement in this case did such a good job of defining class membership that the settlement class should be certified. When U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier of New Orleans certified the settlement class in December 2012, the case seemed to be on a typical track for a mass tort, with both sides benefiting from use of the class action vehicle. Defendants settle these cases because they want the certainty that comes from a classwide release of claims. They can’t get classwide releases without class certification.

U.S. criminal laws don’t apply to conduct abroad: 2nd Circuit

By Alison Frankel
August 30, 2013

Attention, American fraudsters! If you restrict your criminal activities to conduct outside of the United States, you’re safe from prosecution under U.S. laws.

No circuit split on charity-only settlements: Facebook, Public Citizen

By Alison Frankel
August 29, 2013

In 2011, after U.S. District Judge Richard Seeborg approved the $9.5 million settlement of a class action accusing Facebook of violating its users’ privacy through a since-dismantled program that disclosed their online purchases to their friends, the public interest group Public Citizen appealed Seeborg’s ruling to the 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. On behalf of an objecting class member, Public Citizen told the 9th Circuit that Facebook users were not slated to receive a penny in exchange for releasing claims that Facebook’s Beacon program violated their privacy rights. Instead, all of the money in the settlement that didn’t go to class counsel’s legal fees and expenses was to be directed to a new charity, the Digital Trust Foundation, with a two-person advisory board consisting of a Facebook representative and a plaintiffs lawyer from the case. Public Citizen took the position that charity-only payouts, otherwise known as cy pres settlements, are sometimes appropriate, but not when the lucky recipient of class members’ money doesn’t have the same interests as the class.

How a contrarian appellate judge helped brokers in Merrill race case

By Alison Frankel
August 28, 2013

In a historic decision in June 2011, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that female employees of Wal-Mart could not sue the company for gender discrimination as a nationwide class. The court said in Wal-Mart v. Dukes that the women could not attribute any discrimination they’d supposedly suffered to corporate policies because those policies were implemented by local managers. I’m ignoring the subtleties of a long and complex decision, but, in essence, the Supreme Court concluded that Wal-Mart’s nationwide policies weren’t strong enough glue to bind together women with individual employment histories. A sweeping class action, the court said in a decision written by Justice Antonin Scalia, could not provide “a common answer to the crucial discrimination question.”

Judge in Facebook class action: no fees for lawyers for non-cash relief

By Alison Frankel
August 27, 2013

It’s a self-evident truth that if contingency fee lawyers don’t see value in a case, they won’t bring it. With that in mind, I’ve often wondered whether class action defendants should be more vociferous about big fee requests by class counsel. I know what you’re thinking: Plaintiffs lawyers won’t agree to settle unless defense counsel pledge not to oppose their fee request. And realistically, defendants’ main concern is making a case go away as cheaply as possible. How settlement money is divided between class members and their lawyers is, for defendants, a secondary issue, at best. If objecting to class counsel’s fee request will prevent a deal from going through, most defendants won’t object.

WildTangent to SCOTUS: End the patent eligibility madness!

By Alison Frankel
August 26, 2013

On Friday, the online game company WildTangent filed a petition asking the U.S. Supreme Court to decide, once and for all, whether computer-implemented abstract ideas are eligible for patents. According to the company’s lawyers at Latham & Watkins, a three-judge panel of the Federal Circuit Court of Appeals ran amok in June when it held that patent eligibility extends to the concept of permitting online access to copyrighted material in exchange for viewing an advertisement. Instead of seriously considering the Supreme Court’s previous admonition about patent eligibility in Mayo v. Prometheus Laboratories, the WildTangent brief said, the Federal Circuit opinion, written by Chief Judge Randall Rader, sets up an eligibility test so easy that just about every computer-implemented abstract idea can pass. WildTangent contends that the Federal Circuit has contradicted itself, defied the Supreme Court and rewritten the Patent Act to promulgate its own expansive doctrine of patent eligibility.

Did banks jump too soon in opposing eminent domain mortgage seizures?

By Alison Frankel
August 23, 2013

The first rule of litigation in federal court is that you can’t bring a suit unless it’s based on an actual controversy. U.S. courts do not issue advisory opinions. Federal judges only have jurisdiction to oversee disputes that present an issue ripe for decision. And according to a new brief by the city of Richmond, California, its plan to use eminent domain to take over mortgages from mortgage-backed securities trusts is not ripe under Article III of the U.S. Constitution and should not be tested in the suits that MBS trustees filed earlier this month in federal court in San Francisco. Counsel for the city and Mortgage Resolution Partners (the private company supplying the capital for Richmond’s contemplated mortgage takeover plan) contend that Wells Fargo and Deutsche Bank acted precipitately when they moved for a preliminary injunction to block the city from proceeding with eminent domain takeovers.

How SCOTUS’s Amex ruling may help businesses evade class actions

By Alison Frankel
August 22, 2013

Now that the U.S. Supreme Court has pretty much knocked down all barriers to contracts prohibiting classwide arbitration, via 2011′s AT&T Mobility v. Concepcion and last term’s American Express v. Italian Colors, have businesses actually rushed to add mandatory individual arbitration clauses to their contracts? A new study of agreements between franchisors and franchisees finds that they have not, and theorizes that the side effects of arbitration, including the limited right to appeal, may deter some businesses from adopting mandatory arbitration clauses. What’s more, the study’s authors – two law professors with long expertise in arbitration – hypothesize that the Supreme Court’s Amex ruling may permit businesses to prohibit class litigation without the collateral consequences of arbitration agreements.