Alison Frankel

Do surveillance court’s secret rulings violate U.S. Constitution?

By Alison Frankel
July 8, 2013

The more we find out about the mostly secret inner workings of the U.S. Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court, the more questions we should all have about the intersection of national security and Fourth Amendment restrictions on unreasonable searches by government authorities. Based on recent comments by U.S. Supreme Court Justices Elena Kagan and Stephen Breyer, the court is primed for an inevitable constitutional review of the National Security Agency’s program of gathering phone and Internet data from foreign suspects and U.S. citizens alike under provisions of the Patriot Act and the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act. That debate will surely center on the Fourth Amendment, but a lesser-known argument that has popped up in some cases challenging FISA wiretaps raises different constitutional objections to the NSA’s widespread data collection. And just as it was in California’s ban on gay marriage, Article III of the Constitution could be the linchpin of any Supreme Court decision on the legality of the NSA program.

Delaware justices: Do we need new vehicle for post-merger derivative suits?

By Alison Frankel
July 3, 2013

You might not expect Dr. Seuss and Jekyll & Hyde to be invoked in oral arguments before the Delaware Supreme Court on the question of whether shareholder derivative breach-of-duty claims against corporate directors can survive a merger when that merger is allegedly the result of the directors’ misconduct. But indeed they were, amid discussion of slippery, transmogrified claims that left four Delaware justices (as well as lawyers on both sides) searching for analogies.

The 2nd Circuit splits with 10th on tolling time bar in securities cases

By Alison Frankel
July 2, 2013

Is the statute of repose – the once obscure cousin of the statute of limitations that burst into prominence as a defense in litigation over mortgage-backed securities – coming to the U.S. Supreme Court?

SCOTUS’s Prop 8 ruling will complicate ballot initiative process

By Alison Frankel
July 1, 2013

On Friday, two days after the U.S. Supreme Court announced its ruling in Hollingsworth v. Perry, marriage equality came back to California. Governor Jerry Brown, who had refused to appeal U.S. District Judge Vaughn Walker’s beautiful 2010 decision that the state’s bar on same-sex marriage was unconstitutional, ordered county clerks to begin issuing licenses to gay and lesbian couples. California Attorney General Kamala Harris performed the first wedding under the new regime, the San Francisco marriage of Kristin Perry and Sandy Stier, whose challenge to California’s ballot-initiative ban on same-sex marriage led to the Supreme Court’s decision last Wednesday. In Los Angeles, Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa married the other plaintiffs in the original case, Paul Katami and Jeff Zarrillo. Opponents of same-sex marriage filed an emergency petition at the U.S. Supreme Court over the weekend, seeking a temporary halt to the weddings, but Justice Anthony Kennedy, who oversees the 9th Circuit, denied it on Sunday. Marriage equality is now officially the law in California.

From Aspen: Justice Kagan calls surveillance cases ‘growth industry’

By Alison Frankel
July 1, 2013

Speaking late Saturday afternoon at the Aspen Ideas Festival, U.S Supreme Court Justice Elena Kagan was every bit as diplomatic as you would expect a woman who has survived the Senate confirmation process to be. Chief Justice John Roberts? “A great chief justice,” who faces the “tall order (of) trying to forge agreement” on a court whose members traditionally treasure the right to go their own way. Justice Clarence Thomas? “I enjoy him enormously. He’s a justice with incredible integrity and a very principled one,” Kagan said. “We disagree on a lot of stuff and we’re going to disagree on a lot of stuff but I enjoy every moment I spend with him.”

From Aspen: America’s opportunity gap – and why it’s bad for lawyers

By Alison Frankel
June 28, 2013

Near the end of a delightful interview at the Aspen Ideas Festival, CBS journalist Rita Braver asked Williams & Connolly superlawyer Robert Barnett – who also happens to be her husband of many decades – what advice he would offer to young attorneys. Could they, Braver asked, replicate his career path, which took him from a Supreme Court clerkship to the representation of publishing and political luminaries, and service as a sachem of the Democratic party? Barnett said no.

Biggest idea at Aspen Ideas Fest: Don’t run from risk. Grab it.

By Alison Frankel
June 27, 2013

It is a truth (almost) universally acknowledged that a law firm in possession of a strong client base must be in want of pretty much nothing. (Apologies to Jane Austen.) As a species, lawyers are risk-averse. The practice, after all, is paved in precedent and bad things can happen to you and your clients if you veer off-road.

Election savant Nate Silver: Why punditocracy gets politics wrong

By Alison Frankel
June 27, 2013

If Nate Silver, the data-driven New York Times FiveThirtyEight blogger who nailed state-by-state results in the 2012 presidential election, had been a better baseball player or a more satisfied KPMG numbers cruncher, our current political discourse would be a lot less analytically savvy than it is today.

Wake up, shareholders! Your right to sue corporations may be in danger

By Alison Frankel
June 25, 2013

Do you believe that securities class actions and shareholder derivative suits have any salutary effect on corporate governance – that directors and officers are less likely to misbehave when they’re liable to shareholders (their nominal bosses) in court? If so, you ought to be very worried about a pair of developments in the last week that offer a theoretical framework to end shareholder class actions. If, on the other hand, you’re of the view that shareholder litigation is merely a transfer of wealth from corporations to plaintiffs’ lawyers, with little actual return to investors, you might want to start thinking about how to use the new rulings to stop that from happening.

Journalists and the Espionage Act: Prosecution risk is remote but real

By Alison Frankel
June 24, 2013

Meet the Press host David Gregory brought down the wrath of fellow journalists on Sunday when he asked a provocative question of Glenn Greenwald, the Guardian reporter who broke revelations from Booz Allen contractor Edward Snowden about the U.S. government’s monitoring of citizens’ phone and Internet data. After Gregory and Greenwald discussed the Justice Department’s new Espionage Act charges against Snowden, Gregory asked, “To the extent that you have aided and abetted Snowden, even in his current movements, why shouldn’t you, Mr. Greenwald, be charged with a crime?”