Alison Frankel

Repercussions from Rakoff ruling in Dexia MBS case vs JPMorgan?

By Alison Frankel
April 4, 2013

Amid the fusillade of securities suits against the banks that sponsored and underwrote mortgage-backed notes, there have been a couple of reasons to pay particular attention to the Franco-Belgian bank Dexia’s case against JPMorgan Chase and its predecessors Bear Stearns and WaMu Mortgage. For starters, it was a big case: $1.6 billion in MBS and supposed damages of about $800 million. Moreover, Dexia’s lawyers at Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossmann had piled allegations into an amended complaint so apparently damning that it was the basis of a splashy story in The New York Times. And finally, the case was shaping up as a bellwether for MBS claims by individual investors. The litigation was on the rocket docket of U.S. Senior District Judge Jed Rakoff of Manhattan, who denied the bank’s motion to dismiss last September and talked in a recent hearing about a July trial date on Dexia’s claims. Given the resounding victory Rakoff delivered in February to the bond insurer Assured Guaranty in Assured’s MBS case against Flagstar Bank, the Dexia case seemed like it could be a perfect storm for defendants: a strong plaintiffs’ firm trying a high-profile case before a judge with demonstrated skepticism for bank defenses.

The future of securities litigation? Shareholders sue RBS (in London)

By Alison Frankel
April 3, 2013

There may be no more glaring example of the shifting terrain for securities litigation than the case against the Royal Bank of Scotland. Back in January 2011, RBS was one of the early beneficiaries of the U.S. Supreme Court’s bar on shareholder suits against foreign defendants. U.S. District Judge Deborah Batts of Manhattan dismissed most of a class action claiming that the bank misled investors about its subprime exposure and the success of its ABN Amro deal. The judge tossed the few remaining claims last September, erasing any chance that RBS would be held liable to shareholders in U.S. courts. The American plaintiffs’ firms that sued RBS and the U.S. pension fund clients that vied to lead the litigation were plumb out of options.

Justices throw up Comcast obstacle in two more class actions

By Alison Frankel
April 2, 2013

Last week, after the U.S. Supreme Court issued its deeply divided 5-to-4 ruling in Comcast v. Behrend, the antitrust class action bar breathed a sigh of relief. Lawyers had been worried the court would rule broadly that in order to be certified, classes must show that they are “susceptible to awarding damages on a classwide basis,” which was the question the Supreme Court had asked Comcast counsel to address. The majority, in an opinion written by Justice Antonin Scalia, seemed to answer the somewhat different question of whether trial and appellate courts may delve into the merits of the plaintiffs’ damages theory before certifying the class. Antitrust plaintiffs’ lawyers told my Reuters colleague Andrew Longstreth that the Comcast decision would have little impact on class certification because they could tailor damages allegations to match their theories of liability.

What remains of Libor litigation with antitrust, RICO knocked out?

By Alison Frankel
April 1, 2013

Make no mistake: A 161-page ruling late Friday by the New York federal court judge overseeing private litigation stemming from manipulation of the benchmark London Interbank Offered Rate (Libor) has devastated investor claims that they were the victims of artificially suppressed Libor rates. U.S. District Judge Naomi Reice Buchwald of Manhattan ruled that owners of fixed and floating-rate securities do not have standing to bring antitrust claims against the banks that participated in the Libor rate-setting process, even though some of those banks have admitted to collusion in megabucks settlements with regulators. If that result, which Buchwald herself called “incongruous,” weren’t bad enough, the judge also cut off an alternative route to treble damages for supposed Libor victims when she held that federal racketeering claims of fraud by the panel banks are precluded under two different defense theories.

Gay marriage, voters’ rights and the thorny Prop 8 standing problem

By Alison Frankel
March 27, 2013

On Tuesday morning at the U.S. Supreme Court, Charles Cooper of Cooper and Kirk was no more than a sentence into his spiel on the sanctity of traditional marriage when Chief Justice John Roberts interrupted with the request that he first address a more prosaic issue: Do Cooper’s clients, as leading proponents of the 2008 California ballot initiative that banned same-sex marriage, even have standing to defend the initiative, known as Proposition 8, in federal court? By the time oral arguments concluded more than an hour later, it seemedlikelier than not that the court would avoid a sweeping ruling on equal protection under federal law for gays and lesbians – and that they’d do it via a finding that Cooper’s clients did not have standing to bring an appeal.

Robbins Geller faces sanctions in Boeing witness controversy: Posner

By Alison Frankel
March 26, 2013

Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd has had more than its share of problems with recanting confidential witnesses in securities class actions, but an 18-page ruling Tuesday from the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals is the worst news yet for the plaintiffs’ firm. Judge Richard Posner, writing for a panel that also included Judges William Bauer and Diane Sykes, said the firm had ignored red flag warnings that its lone informant in a securities class action against Boeing was unreliable. No lawyer from the prolific plaintiffs’ firm took the trouble of checking out the informant’s allegations, Posner said, yet the firm didn’t hesitate to repeat his claims in an amended complaint against the aerospace company. The appeals court, not surprisingly, refused to revive the class action claiming Boeing misled investors about its Dreamliner planes, but remanded the case to U.S. District Judge Ruben Castillo to determine whether Robbins Geller should be sanctioned under Rule 11, and, if so, for how much money.

Retired NFL stars reject settlement of their own licensing class action

By Alison Frankel
March 25, 2013

In 2009, six retired pro football stars filed a class action against the National Football League in federal court in Minneapolis, claiming that the NFL misappropriated their names and images without their consent. The class action, led by (among others) former Houston Oiler Hall of Famer Elvin Bethea and former Los Angeles Ram All Pro and television star Fred Dryer, asserted that the NFL didn’t compensate its retired players when it used clips from old games to promote the league. In September 2011, the Dryer case was consolidated with two other similar class actions. Three firms, Zimmerman Reed, Hausfeld and Bob Stein, were named interim lead counsel.

Downside of business development: accusations of facilitating cartel

By Alison Frankel
March 22, 2013

Alan Kaplinsky of Ballard Spahr had a good thing going at the turn of the century. Along with a couple of partners at the firm now known as Wilmer Cutler Pickering HaleandDorr, Kaplinsky was the leading lawyer for credit card issuers considering the addition of mandatory arbitration clauses to their agreements with cardholders. Between 1999 and 2003, Kaplinsky and three Wilmer partners, Ronald GreeneChristopher Lipsett and Eric Mogilnicki, led a series of meetings with in-house lawyers for the credit card companies, virtually all of which subsequently hired Wilmer or Ballard Spahr to help them implement new cardholder agreements that mandated arbitration and foreclosed class actions.

2nd Circuit squelches Title VII exception to mandatory arbitration

By Alison Frankel
March 21, 2013

The 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals has been known on occasion to buck the judicial trend of deference to arbitration and champion plaintiffs’ rights to class action litigation. But not if the only justification for classwide litigation is a phantom statutory right. In a notably short and emphatic decision issued Thursday in a closely watched sex discrimination case against Goldman Sachs, a three-judge appellate panel reversed a lower-court ruling that former Goldman managing director Lisa Parisi may pursue a class action despite the mandatory arbitration clause in her employment contract. The appeals court agreed with just about every argument by Goldman’s lawyers at Sullivan & Cromwell, ruling that the bank’s arbitration clause does not preclude Parisi’s statutory rights under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act because she has no private cause of action to claim that her employer engaged in a pattern or practice of discrimination.

The billion-dollar cloud lingering over GM’s bankruptcy

By Alison Frankel
March 20, 2013

More than two years after General Motors received court approval for a plan to issue its old creditors stock in its shiny new self, a dispute among those creditors threatens to saddle the new company with almost $1 billion in liability. In a statement filed this week before U.S. Bankruptcy Judge Robert Gerber of Manhattan, the new company and warring creditor factions disclosed that mediation has failed to produce a settlement of creditor allegations that one group of noteholders extracted preferential treatment from the company as it teetered on the verge of Chapter 11 in 2009. The failure of mediation means that Gerber will be left to reach a ruling based on testimony he heard last fall in an adversary proceeding initiated by the trustee for GM’s unsecured creditors.