Alison Frankel

The big surprise in bids to lead GM ignition switch litigation

By Alison Frankel
July 29, 2014

David Boies of Boies, Schiller & Flexner — the superstar litigator best known as the defender of same-sex marriage, Al Gore, securities class actions and Napster — is ready for a different sort of a challenge: He wants to be a products liability class action lawyer.

How a lone New York judge squeezed billions from banks in MBS cases

By Alison Frankel
July 28, 2014

Asking a federal appeals court to step into the fray of an ongoing case to reverse a decision by a trial judge is extraordinary. Petitions for a writ of mandamus, as such requests are known, assert that trial judges have committed such egregious errors that their appellate overseers must undo the damage immediately, before the case gets to a final judgment. Mandamus petitions are a desperation move, a last resort when you’ve got nothing to lose from alienating a trial judge who’s already ruled against you.

As crisis litigation draws to close, lessons for investors

By Alison Frankel
July 16, 2014

We’re near the end. With the news Wednesday that Bank of America will pay AIG $650 million to settle their long-running and many-tentacled litigation over mortgage backed securities –along with a report in The Wall Street Journal that the credit rating agency Standard & Poor’s is contemplating a $1 billion settlement with the Justice Department for its MBS rating failures — it’s time to declare the twilight of financial crisis litigation.

Kozinski amends opinion in 9th Circuit ‘Innocence’ case v. Google

By Alison Frankel
July 15, 2014

Something strange happened Friday in the infamous case of Cindy Lee Garcia v. Google at the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Chief Judge Alex Kozinski, who wrote the opinion in February that enjoined Google from linking to the anti-Islam film “Innocence of Muslims,” filed an amended opinion, even as the entire 9th Circuit considers Google’s petition for en banc review of the controversial February ruling.

DOJ should end secret selection process for corporate watchdogs

By Alison Frankel
July 14, 2014

Thomas Perrelli just won quite a plum assignment. The former U.S. associate attorney general, who resumed his partnership at the law firm Jenner & Block in 2012, was appointed Monday to serve as Citigroup’s independent monitor as part of the bank’s $7 billion settlement with the Justice Department and five state attorneys.

Wal-Mart case in Delaware: How much discovery can shareholders get?

By Alison Frankel
July 11, 2014

Shareholder lawyer Stuart Grant of Grant & Eisenhofer told me Friday that he was feeling pretty good about his oral argument at the Delaware Supreme Court the previous day, in a case that will determine how much discovery plaintiffs are permitted when they sue to see corporate books and records.

Motorola to 7th Circuit: Make Judge Posner follow the rules

By Alison Frankel
July 10, 2014

I didn’t think Motorola’s antitrust appeal at the 7th U.S. Court of Appeals could get any stranger. This, after all, is the billion-dollar case that prompted a bizarre showdown over international antitrust policy between the U.S. solicitor general and a three-judge appellate panel led by Richard Posner.

The last, best chance for besieged bank defendants

By Alison Frankel
July 10, 2014

Goldman Sachs has a little more than two months for a miracle to happen.

Otherwise, on Sept. 29, the bank will go to trial in federal court in Manhattan against the Federal Housing Finance Agency to defend claims that Goldman deceived Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac about the quality of the mortgage-backed securities it was peddling before the financial crash.

Is this the inside info that triggered Goldman’s MBS ‘big short’?

By Alison Frankel
July 9, 2014

It is an axiom of the financial crisis that Goldman Sachs realized before any of the other big banks that the mortgage-backed securities market was going to implode in 2007. Goldman dumped MBS and shorted the market, turning a profit in its mortgage department when every other major financial institution suffered record losses.

Early test of Delaware ‘loser pays’ bylaws looms in Biolase dispute

By Alison Frankel
July 8, 2014

(Reuters) – On Monday, a Delaware shareholder firm issued a press release urging shareholders of the dental laser company Biolase to get in touch if they’re concerned about allegations that board members leaked corporate financials, among other supposed shenanigans. You know what that means: Class action firms are circling the beleaguered company, looking for a reason to file a shareholder derivative suit accusing Biolase’s board of breaching its duties.