Opinion

Alison Frankel

Can banks force clients to litigate, not arbitrate?

Alison Frankel
Apr 3, 2014 20:38 UTC

If you are a customer of a big bank — let’s say a merchant unhappy about the fees you’re being charged to process credit card transactions — good luck trying to bring claims in federal court when you’re subject to an arbitration provision. As you probably recall, in last term’s opinion in American Express v. Italian Colors, the U.S. Supreme Court continued its genuflection at the altar of the Federal Arbitration Act, holding definitively that if you’ve signed an agreement requiring you to arbitrate your claims, you’re stuck with it even if you can’t afford to vindicate your statutory rights via individual arbitration.

But what if you’re a bank customer who wants to go to arbitration — and, in a weird role-reversal, the bank is insisting that you must instead bring a federal district court suit? Will courts show the same deference to arbitration when a plaintiff, rather than a defendant, is invoking the right to arbitrate and not litigate?

On Friday, the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals will hear a rare tandem argument in two cases that present the question of whether bank clients have the right to arbitrate their claims even though they’ve signed contracts with forum selection clauses directing disputes to federal court. Believe it or not, the 2nd Circuit will be the third federal appellate court to answer this question, which has divided its predecessors. In January 2013, the 4th Circuit ruled that a UBS client may proceed to arbitration, but on Friday, the 9th Circuit held that a Goldman Sachs customer who agreed to a nearly identical forum selection clause must sue in federal court. To add to the confusion, the 9th Circuit panel was split, which led the majority to call the case “a close question.”

All of the appellate cases date back to the days when banks were hawking auction-rate securities as convenient instruments for clients who wanted to issue debt. Interest rates on the long-range, purported liquid securities would be periodically reset through an auction process, and banks told clients that they could hedge against a rise in rates through swap agreements. What they didn’t mention — at least according to clients — is that banks were artificially propping up the ARS market with their own bids on the securities. The whole wobbly structure collapsed in February 2008, and clients were marooned with debt carrying fast-rising interest rates that their swaps couldn’t offset.

Those debt issuer clients, to be clear, were different from bank brokerage customers who bought auction-rate securities under the misimpression that they were safe and liquid investments. Regulators made sure that banks bought back ARS from most of their brokerage customers. Other customers won great results in arbitrations before Financial Industry Regulatory Authority panels. (They fared less well in federal courts, where judges mostly ruled that banks were protected by website disclaimers about the ARS market that they’d posted after an investigation by the Securities and Exchange Commission in 2006.) Debt issuers, however, had a more subtle theory than investors in auction-rate securities, developed by the New Orleans firm Fishman Haygood Phelps Walmsley Willis & Swanson: They claimed that their financial advisers were responsible for the high interest rates they had to pay on bonds structured as ARS.

U.S. criminal laws don’t apply to conduct abroad: 2nd Circuit

Alison Frankel
Aug 30, 2013 19:11 UTC

Attention, American fraudsters! If you restrict your criminal activities to conduct outside of the United States, you’re safe from prosecution under U.S. laws.

That’s not exactly how a three-judge panel of the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals worded its decision Friday in U.S. v. Alberto Vilar and Gary Tanaka, but it’s the effective result of the appellate court’s finding that criminal statutes – in particular, criminal securities fraud laws – don’t extend overseas. The opinion noted that the 2nd Circuit has long recognized a presumption against the extraterritorial application of U.S. criminal laws. But make no mistake, the Vilar ruling is a major interpretation of what the court acknowledged to be an open question after the U.S. Supreme Court’s 2010 admonition against overextending the scope of U.S. laws in Morrison v. National Australia Bank. Namely, does Morrison apply to criminal as well as civil laws? The 2nd Circuit panel – Judges Jon Newman, Jose Cabranes and Chester Straub – could not have answered the question more decisively. “The general rule,” wrote Cabranes, “is that the presumption against extraterritoriality applies to criminal statutes.”

That reasoning could result in the dismissal of some counts of the government’s indictment of onetime SAC Capital trader Mathew Martoma, whose lawyers at Goodwin Procter argued in a brief filed in June that Morrison precludes charges based on trading in the American Depository Receipts of Elan, a company whose stock trades on Irish and British exchanges. The intersection of Morrison and fraud prosecution is also at issue in a 2nd Circuit appeal by former Sky Capital executives Ross Mandell and Andrew Harrington, who were convicted of defrauding mostly British investors in London-traded securities.

The 2nd Circuit splits with 10th on tolling time bar in securities cases

Alison Frankel
Jul 2, 2013 21:36 UTC

Is the statute of repose – the once obscure cousin of the statute of limitations that burst into prominence as a defense in litigation over mortgage-backed securities – coming to the U.S. Supreme Court?

That’s the thrilling prospect now before us, thanks to a decision last week by the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals in a case against the onetime mortgage securitizer IndyMac and underwriters of some of its MBS offerings. The 2nd Circuit panel – Judges Jose Cabranes, Reena Raggi and Susan Carney – ruled that the filing of a class action does not stop the clock for class members on the three-year statute of repose for federal securities claims. That holding is contrary to a ruling from the 10th Circuit, which found in Joseph v. Q.T. Wiles in 2000 that a pending class action tolls the statute of repose as well as the statute of limitations. The Roberts Court is known for granting review even of arcane issues that have split the federal circuits, and tolling of the statute of repose could impact the outcome of a lot more cases than, say, the intersection of appellate deadlines and awards for contractual legal fees, which the Supreme Court is already scheduled to hear next term.

Plaintiffs lawyer Joseph Tabacco of Berman DeValerio, who was on the wrong end of last week’s 2nd Circuit decision, told me his clients have not yet decided on their next step, which could be to ask the 2nd Circuit for en banc review or to ask the panel for a ruling that its holding applies only prospectively. The statute of repose isn’t as problematic in this particular case as it once seemed, Tabacco said, because some plaintiffs who had been excluded from the IndyMac MBS class action saw their claims revived after the 2nd Circuit remade the rules for MBS class standing in NECA-IBEW v. Goldman. Nevertheless, Tabacco told me, “this is too important an issue” to let the 2nd Circuit panel’s decision go unchallenged. “There are well-reasoned opinions on both sides,” he said. “Clearly, this is an open legal question.”

Robbins Geller faces sanctions in Boeing witness controversy: Posner

Alison Frankel
Mar 26, 2013 20:47 UTC

Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd has had more than its share of problems with recanting confidential witnesses in securities class actions, but an 18-page ruling Tuesday from the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals is the worst news yet for the plaintiffs’ firm. Judge Richard Posner, writing for a panel that also included Judges William Bauer and Diane Sykes, said the firm had ignored red flag warnings that its lone informant in a securities class action against Boeing was unreliable. No lawyer from the prolific plaintiffs’ firm took the trouble of checking out the informant’s allegations, Posner said, yet the firm didn’t hesitate to repeat his claims in an amended complaint against the aerospace company. The appeals court, not surprisingly, refused to revive the class action claiming Boeing misled investors about its Dreamliner planes, but remanded the case to U.S. District Judge Ruben Castillo to determine whether Robbins Geller should be sanctioned under Rule 11, and, if so, for how much money.

“The plaintiffs’ lawyers had made confident assurances in their complaints about a confidential source – their only barrier to dismissal of their suit – even though none of the lawyers had spoken to the source and their investigator had acknowledged that she couldn’t verify what (according to her) he had told her,” Posner wrote. “Their failure to inquire further puts one in mind of ostrich tactics – of failing to inquire for fear that the inquiry might reveal stronger evidence of their scienter regarding the authenticity of the confidential source than the flimsy evidence of scienter they were able to marshal against Boeing.”

Ouch. But that wasn’t all. Posner also noted that Robbins Geller has been accused of “similar misconduct” in three other reported cases: Campo v. Sears Holdings, a 2010 ruling in which the 2nd Circuit said that deposition testimony from confidential informants didn’t match up with the plaintiffs’ complaint; Applestein v. Medivation, a 2012 ruling by U.S. District Judge Edward Chen of San Francisco, who held that Robbins Geller confidential informants were not reliable; and Belmont v. Suntrust, a 2012 decision in which U.S. District JudgeWilliam Duffey of Atlanta found the firm’s amended complaint to be “misleading or, at least, unsupported,” after confidential witnesses recanted allegations attributed to them. (Duffey denied a motion for Rule 11 sanctions against Robbins Geller, though he said it was “a close and reluctant call.”)

2nd Circuit squelches Title VII exception to mandatory arbitration

Alison Frankel
Mar 21, 2013 21:03 UTC

The 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals has been known on occasion to buck the judicial trend of deference to arbitration and champion plaintiffs’ rights to class action litigation. But not if the only justification for classwide litigation is a phantom statutory right. In a notably short and emphatic decision issued Thursday in a closely watched sex discrimination case against Goldman Sachs, a three-judge appellate panel reversed a lower-court ruling that former Goldman managing director Lisa Parisi may pursue a class action despite the mandatory arbitration clause in her employment contract. The appeals court agreed with just about every argument by Goldman’s lawyers at Sullivan & Cromwell, ruling that the bank’s arbitration clause does not preclude Parisi’s statutory rights under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act because she has no private cause of action to claim that her employer engaged in a pattern or practice of discrimination.

A contrary ruling by the 2nd Circuit would have punched a huge hole in employment agreements mandating individual arbitration. Instead, the appeals court acknowledged that employers can curtail class actions against them, even when they’re accused of violating employees’ civil rights.

The 2nd Circuit panel (Judges Barrington ParkerReena Raggi and Gerard Lynch) said that U.S. Magistrate Judge James Francis and U.S. District Judge Leonard Sand erred when they found that Parisi could not vindicate her Title VII rights without classwide litigation. Parisi’s trial lawyers at Outten & Golden had persuaded the lower courts that she could only prove Goldman’s supposed pattern or practice of discrimination – and thus assure her statutory civil rights – through a class action, because her employment agreement prohibited classwide arbitration. But the 2nd Circuit sided with Goldman. As an initial matter, the opinion said, the Civil Rights Act of 1991 contains specific language endorsing arbitration as a vehicle for resolving discrimination claims, and courts have “consistently found” that civil rights claims can be subject to arbitration. Moreover, the court said, the pattern-or-practice method of proof is intended to enable the government to enforce Title VII on behalf of employees, not to give private plaintiffs a freestanding cause of action. And since Parisi has no statutory right to pursue a pattern-or-practice class action, the 2nd Circuit held, she cannot rely on that right to invalidate the mandatory arbitration clause in her employment contract.

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