Alison Frankel

Can banks force clients to litigate, not arbitrate?

By Alison Frankel
April 3, 2014

If you are a customer of a big bank — let’s say a merchant unhappy about the fees you’re being charged to process credit card transactions — good luck trying to bring claims in federal court when you’re subject to an arbitration provision. As you probably recall, in last term’s opinion in American Express v. Italian Colors, the U.S. Supreme Court continued its genuflection at the altar of the Federal Arbitration Act, holding definitively that if you’ve signed an agreement requiring you to arbitrate your claims, you’re stuck with it even if you can’t afford to vindicate your statutory rights via individual arbitration.

U.S. criminal laws don’t apply to conduct abroad: 2nd Circuit

By Alison Frankel
August 30, 2013

Attention, American fraudsters! If you restrict your criminal activities to conduct outside of the United States, you’re safe from prosecution under U.S. laws.

The 2nd Circuit splits with 10th on tolling time bar in securities cases

By Alison Frankel
July 2, 2013

Is the statute of repose – the once obscure cousin of the statute of limitations that burst into prominence as a defense in litigation over mortgage-backed securities – coming to the U.S. Supreme Court?

Robbins Geller faces sanctions in Boeing witness controversy: Posner

By Alison Frankel
March 26, 2013

Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd has had more than its share of problems with recanting confidential witnesses in securities class actions, but an 18-page ruling Tuesday from the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals is the worst news yet for the plaintiffs’ firm. Judge Richard Posner, writing for a panel that also included Judges William Bauer and Diane Sykes, said the firm had ignored red flag warnings that its lone informant in a securities class action against Boeing was unreliable. No lawyer from the prolific plaintiffs’ firm took the trouble of checking out the informant’s allegations, Posner said, yet the firm didn’t hesitate to repeat his claims in an amended complaint against the aerospace company. The appeals court, not surprisingly, refused to revive the class action claiming Boeing misled investors about its Dreamliner planes, but remanded the case to U.S. District Judge Ruben Castillo to determine whether Robbins Geller should be sanctioned under Rule 11, and, if so, for how much money.

2nd Circuit squelches Title VII exception to mandatory arbitration

By Alison Frankel
March 21, 2013

The 2nd Circuit Court of Appeals has been known on occasion to buck the judicial trend of deference to arbitration and champion plaintiffs’ rights to class action litigation. But not if the only justification for classwide litigation is a phantom statutory right. In a notably short and emphatic decision issued Thursday in a closely watched sex discrimination case against Goldman Sachs, a three-judge appellate panel reversed a lower-court ruling that former Goldman managing director Lisa Parisi may pursue a class action despite the mandatory arbitration clause in her employment contract. The appeals court agreed with just about every argument by Goldman’s lawyers at Sullivan & Cromwell, ruling that the bank’s arbitration clause does not preclude Parisi’s statutory rights under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act because she has no private cause of action to claim that her employer engaged in a pattern or practice of discrimination.