Opinion

Alison Frankel

$90 bln answer: Rakoff says Picard has no standing in bank suits

Alison Frankel
Jul 29, 2011 19:57 UTC

In the end, it wasn’t even a close call.

Using words like “conjecture,” “bootstrapping,” and “a stretch,” Manhattan federal court judge Jed Rakoff on Thursday decimated trustee Irving Picard‘s multibillion-dollar campaign against the banks that allegedly helped Bernard Madoff engineer his fraud, in a 26-page opinion that left no room for doubt. Rakoff so thoroughly rejected each and every one of Picard’s arguments for why he had the right to bring common law fraud claims against HSBC and UniCredit that the judge didn’t even cite much legal precedent through the first half of the ruling. He simply applied what he calls “ordinary use of the English language” to conclude that no reading of the relevant laws or cases grants Picard standing to sue the banks for unjust enrichment and aiding and abetting fraud and breach of fiduciary duty. This ruling derived its power — and it is a very powerful opinion — from its simplicity.

Rakoff’s ruling immediately affected Picard’s $6.6 billion case against HSBC and a parallel $2.2 billion case against UniCredit. But it’s going to have huge repercussions beyond those suits. Judge Rakoff is also presiding over Picard’s $60 billion racketeering case against UniCredit and related defendants, and it’s a certainty that UniCredit’s lawyers at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom will ask the judge to apply his ruling on Picard’s standing and bounce that suit as well.

Meanwhile, Judge Colleen McMahon, who is Judge Rakoff’s neighbor on the 14th floor of the Manhattan federal courthouse, is poised to rule on Picard’s standing in his common-law suits against UBS and JPMorgan Chase. McMahon is certainly an independent-minded judge so it would be a mistake to assume she’ll simply follow Rakoff’s lead. But Rakoff knew full well how intensely his ruling on Picard’s standing would be scrutinized, and nevertheless showed no equivocation in his opinion. It’s hard to imagine Judge McMahon reaching a contrary conclusion.

If McMahon — and, ultimately, the appellate courts — agree with Rakoff, Picard’s audacious attempt to hold the banks responsible for failing to end Madoff’s Ponzi scheme is doomed. As I reported a few weeks back, Picard’s standing to bring common-law claims against the banks is a threshold issue. To prosecute a suit, you have to be able to show that you were injured. Picard, as the bankruptcy trustee in the Madoff Chapter 11, stands in the shoes of the debtor, Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities. But his common-law claims against the banks weren’t brought on behalf of Madoff’s now-defunct investment company — which, as Rakoff explained in Thursday’s ruling, is barred from suing alleged co-conspirators like the banks by a doctrine called in pari delicto. Instead, Picard’s lawyers at Baker & Hostetler said they were bringing claims against the banks on behalf of Madoff’s customers, who lost billions when Madoff’s scheme was exposed.

HSBC’s lawyers at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton and UniCredit’s Skadden counsel countered that as bankruptcy trustee, Picard has no right to stand in the shoes of Madoff’s customers.

Picard drops $2bl in claims against UBS? Um, no, he doesn’t

Alison Frankel
Jul 20, 2011 22:44 UTC

The damages claims in Irving Picard’s pursuit of the banks that allegedly helped Ponzi schemer Bernard Madoff are so outsized that even a simple two-page letter from a federal judge can lead to a $2 billion kerfuffle. On Tuesday, Manhattan federal district court judge Colleen McMahon sent a letter to lawyers for Picard, the bankruptcy trustee for Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities, and to lawyers for UBS, which is a defendant in two of Picard’s suits. UBS’s counsel at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher had moved in June to transfer two Picard suits naming the bank as a defendant out of bankruptcy court and into federal court; Judge McMahon, who is overseeing Picard’s case against JPMorgan Chase, agreed to take the cases on July 7 and began requesting information, by letter, from Picard counsel at Baker & Hostetler and UBS counsel at Gibson Dunn.

To understand Judge McMahon’s July 19 letter — and how it was misinterpreted — it’s important to know that in the two actions naming UBS defendants, Picard is asserting different causes of action and seeking different amounts of money. In the case known as Luxalpha, Picard and Baker & Hostetler claim that UBS breached its fiduciary duty and aided and abetted fraud. That suit demands $2 billion from UBS and other defendants. The other case, known as LIF, is a clawback action demanding the return of all the money the bank and other defendants redeemed from Madoff or earned in fees, a total of $550 million, according to Picard. Though the press release announcing the LIF suit refers to “alleged financial fraud” by UBS, the suit actually claims only unjust enrichment and another common-law cause of action as an alternative to the clawback theory.

In a July 14 letter, Judge McMahon told Baker & Hostetler and Gibson Dunn that she needed more explanation of how the LIF and Luxalpha cases intersected and overlapped, and warned the lawyers that she wasn’t going to slow down the JPMorgan case to address complications in the UBS suit. In response, the Picard lawyers decided to simplify matters, reasoning that if they dropped the alternative-theory common law claims in the $550 million LIF case, there would be no reason for the case to stay in federal court. Picard could simply go after the $550 million in a bankruptcy court clawback action.

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