Alison Frankel

Justice Department sides with Madoff’s banks on SCOTUS review

By Alison Frankel
May 27, 2014

Not every shred of hope is lost for Bernard Madoff trustee Irving Picard in his quest to recover billions from the international banks he has accused of abetting Madoff’s fraud. But it’s looking bleak for the Madoff trustee after the Justice Department filed a brief Friday at the U.S. Supreme Court. In response to the court’s request for the government’s view of Picard’s petition for a writ of certiorari, Solicitor General Donald Verrilli advised the justices to reject Picard’s appeal.

Former SEC GC Becker gives $556k gift to Madoff investors

By Alison Frankel
February 29, 2012

There’s a very good chance that former Securities and Exchange Commission general counsel David Becker owes absolutely nothing to the folks who lost money in Bernard Madoff’s Ponzi scheme. Nevertheless, on Monday, Becker and his two brothers agreed to turn over every penny of the proceeds they received from their mother’s long-ago Madoff investment account, a total of $556,017. Becker, a partner at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton, didn’t return my call seeking comment. But he is doubtless hoping that the $556,017 settlement with Madoff bankruptcy trustee Irving Picard of Baker & Hostetler puts an end to the ugliest chapter in his career.

Why Rakoff dumped Picard’s $60 bln RICO case v. Unicredit

By Alison Frankel
February 23, 2012

Over the last six months, U.S. Senior District Judge Jed Rakoff has made Irving Picard of Baker & Hostetler look more like Don Quixote than a white knight riding to the rescue of investors who lost billions in Bernard Madoff’s Ponzi scheme.

Inside the shadowy market for Madoff claims

By Alison Frankel
January 14, 2012

One of the most intriguing offshoots of the mess Bernard Madoff created is the underground market for claims against the estate of his bankrupt securities firm. Last June, when the Wall Street Journal ran a revelatory story on big banks’ trading in Madoff claims, suits by Madoff trustee Irving Picard of Baker Hostetler seemed so promising that claims were trading at 75 cents on the dollar. But according to fascinating new litigation between Deutsche Bank and two Madoff feeder funds, the value of claims has been dropping ever since, and was down to 60 cents on the dollar last month. The billion-dollar declaratory judgment complaint by Kingate Global and Kingate Euro against Deutsche Bank doesn’t offer an explanation for the declining value of Madoff claims. But it’s not much of a leap of inference to guess that U.S. District Judges Jed Rakoff and Colleen McMahon of Manhattan federal district court have more than a little to do with it.

Are big banks now in the clear for allegedly aiding Madoff?

By Alison Frankel
November 2, 2011

Irving Picard has given the bankruptcy laws one hell of a workout. As trustee in the Chapter 7 bankruptcy of Bernard Madoff’s securities firm, Picard, a partner at Baker & Hostetler, has been more aggressive and creative than any bankruptcy trustee in history in his search for defendants to blame for Madoff’s epic Ponzi scheme. His most ambitious gambit, as everyone knows, was a series of megabillion-dollar suits against the international financial institutions that Picard’s team of lawyers at Baker & Hostetler accused of willfully ignoring warnings of Madoff’s fraud.

Mets ruling could upend Madoff bankruptcy

By Alison Frankel
September 28, 2011

Helen Chaitman of Becker & Poliakoff represents more than 300 investors who had accounts with Bernard Madoff. For more than two years she’s hammered away at one particular argument in federal bankruptcy court, in Congress, even on YouTube: Madoff bankruptcy trustee Irving Picard of Baker & Hostetler shouldn’t be allowed to demand the return of profits that Madoff investors pulled out of their accounts as long ago as 2002, six years before the Ponzi scheme imploded in December 2008. On Tuesday night, Chaitman finally found vindication, even though it wasn’t in any of her cases. Manhattan federal judge Jed Rakoff, ruling in Picard’s fraud case against the owners of the New York Mets, concluded that a section of the federal bankruptcy code precludes Picard from attempting to claw back money Madoff investors pulled out of the Ponzi scheme before 2006.

Fraud and the feeder fund: How Merkin dodged fed. class action

By Alison Frankel
September 26, 2011

You had to be a sophisticated investor if you wanted to give J. Ezra Merkin your money. The hedge fund director made that clear in the offering documents for three of his funds: investors had to entrust considerable assets to him (at least $5 million for individuals and $25 million for businesses); had to conduct their own due diligence before deciding to invest; and had to accept the risk that Merkin’s funds might lose their money. Unsaid, but well-understood by many of the investors in Merkin’s Ascot fund (at least according to Merkin lawyer Andrew Levander of Dechert), was that Merkin would be feeding investors’ money to Bernard Madoff.

Picard drops $2bl in claims against UBS? Um, no, he doesn’t

By Alison Frankel
July 20, 2011

The damages claims in Irving Picard’s pursuit of the banks that allegedly helped Ponzi schemer Bernard Madoff are so outsized that even a simple two-page letter from a federal judge can lead to a $2 billion kerfuffle. On Tuesday, Manhattan federal district court judge Colleen McMahon sent a letter to lawyers for Picard, the bankruptcy trustee for Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities, and to lawyers for UBS, which is a defendant in two of Picard’s suits. UBS’s counsel at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher had moved in June to transfer two Picard suits naming the bank as a defendant out of bankruptcy court and into federal court; Judge McMahon, who is overseeing Picard’s case against JPMorgan Chase, agreed to take the cases on July 7 and began requesting information, by letter, from Picard counsel at Baker & Hostetler and UBS counsel at Gibson Dunn.