Alison Frankel

Kozinski amends opinion in 9th Circuit ‘Innocence’ case v. Google

By Alison Frankel
July 15, 2014

Something strange happened Friday in the infamous case of Cindy Lee Garcia v. Google at the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals. Chief Judge Alex Kozinski, who wrote the opinion in February that enjoined Google from linking to the anti-Islam film “Innocence of Muslims,” filed an amended opinion, even as the entire 9th Circuit considers Google’s petition for en banc review of the controversial February ruling.

Lesson from the smartphone wars: Litigation is not a business plan

By Alison Frankel
May 19, 2014

After almost five years of suing each other in courts in the United States and Europe over patents on mobile devices, Apple and Google abruptly announced Friday night that they’ve called a ceasefire: They’re dropping all of the litigation. They’re not even making a deal to cross-license one another’s IP, just declaring a truce and walking away.

Google friends swamp 9th Circuit in ‘Innocence of Muslims’ case

By Alison Frankel
April 15, 2014

Is there anyone who doesn’t sympathize with the actor Cindy Lee Garcia, who was baldly deceived into appearing in the abhorrent anti-Islam film “Innocence of Muslims”?

First Amendment protects Internet search results: N.Y. judge

By Alison Frankel
March 28, 2014

U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman of Manhattan grabbed the chance Thursday to set precedent on a question that has received surprisingly little attention in the courts: Does the First Amendment’s protection of free speech extend to the results of Internet searches? Furman was clearly captivated by the issue as an intellectual challenge, delving into the vigorous academic discussion of the First Amendment and Internet search even deeper than the two sides in the case, the Chinese search engine Baidu and the activists who sued the site for supposedly violating their civil rights by blocking their pro-democracy works from appearing in search results. In a supersmart opinion that Furman seems to have written to be widely read, the judge concluded that when search engines exercise editorial judgment – even if that judgment is just algorithms that determine how results will be listed – they are entitled to free speech protection.

How Apple botched its fair rate case against Motorola

By Alison Frankel
November 6, 2012

I know Apple is a brilliantly managed company represented by brilliant outside counsel. But I cannot for the life of me figure out Apple’s endgame strategy in its breach-of-contract case against Motorola in federal court in Madison, Wisconsin.

More Apple antitrust woes: CEO, directors at hub of poaching case

By Alison Frankel
April 19, 2012

It’s not easy for antitrust plaintiffs to get past a defense motion to dismiss. Before the U.S. Supreme Court raised the pleading standard for everyone in Ashcroft v. Iqbal in 2009, it imposed that tough burden on antitrust claimants in Bell Atlantic v. Twombly, a 2007 opinion that held it’s not enough just to argue that alleged conspirators engaged in parallel price-fixing. Under Twombly, antitrust complaints have to offer detailed and specific facts to support a plausible argument that defendants colluded to restrict competition.

Apple and Microsoft v. Google: patent war shifts to antitrust

By Alison Frankel
April 4, 2012

In a really smart piece last month, my Reuters pal Dan Levine wrote that Steve Jobs’ promise to kill Google’s Android operating system has not been fulfilled. Instead, wrote Levine and co-author Poornima Gupta, Apple’s patent war against Android users Motorola, Samsung, and HTC had become “a costly global war of attrition.” Both sides have won skirmishes, but no battle has been decisive. The Reuters story quoted Judge Richard Posner of the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals, who is overseeing a Motorola case in U.S. District Court in Chicago. “You’re not going to shut down the smartphone,” Posner told Apple’s lawyer. “[And] they’re not going to shut down the iPhone.”

Following Google, Microsoft tries to unring a bell

By Alison Frankel
November 17, 2011

The big guns are rolling out on both sides of Microsoft’s patent infringement suit against Barnes & Noble at the U.S. International Trade Commission. Microsoft has no fewer than four firms (Sidley Austin; Orrick, Herrington & Sutcliffe; Woodcock Washburn; and Adduci, Mastriani and Schaumberg) working on the six-month-old case, in which it accuses Barnes & Noble’s Nook e-readers of infringing Microsoft patents. Barnes & Noble this week supplemented its team of Cravath, Swaine & Moore and Kenyon & Kenyon with Paul Brinkman‘s group from Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan. The Quinn addition is notable because Barnes & Noble’s devices use Google’s Android operating system; Quinn, which is one of Google’s go-to IP firms, previously defended the Android system in Apple’s ITC case against HTC.

Nortel IP sale will help Google win OK for Motorola bid

By Alison Frankel
August 18, 2011

Remember the Cold War military doctrine of Mutually Assured Destruction? The idea was that if the United States and the Soviet Union both knew the enemy had enough weapons to wipe the entire country off the map, neither would actually use those weapons. Mutually Assured Destruction got the entire world through the age of fallout shelters and Barry Goldwater. So the doctrine should be powerful enough to get Google, Apple and Microsoft past Justice Department antitrust regulators.

Microsoft beats Google in Motorola fight

By Alison Frankel
August 16, 2011

Monday was mostly a good day for Google and Motorola. Unless you’re on vacation where there’s no Internet access, in which case you’re not reading this, you’re surely aware that Google announced its $12.5 billion acquisition of Motorola, which means that Google is picking up one of the best patent portfolios in wireless history — and supposedly had the pleasure of besting Microsoft in doing so. But the news wasn’t all good for Google and its new best friend, Motorola. Deep down in the patent litigation trenches at the U.S. International Trade Commission, Administrative Law Judge Theodore Essex denied Google’s high-profile, third-party motion for sanctions against Microsoft in Microsoft’s infringement suit against Motorola.