Alison Frankel

Why Rakoff dumped Picard’s $60 bln RICO case v. Unicredit

By Alison Frankel
February 23, 2012

Over the last six months, U.S. Senior District Judge Jed Rakoff has made Irving Picard of Baker & Hostetler look more like Don Quixote than a white knight riding to the rescue of investors who lost billions in Bernard Madoff’s Ponzi scheme.

Inside the shadowy market for Madoff claims

By Alison Frankel
January 14, 2012

One of the most intriguing offshoots of the mess Bernard Madoff created is the underground market for claims against the estate of his bankrupt securities firm. Last June, when the Wall Street Journal ran a revelatory story on big banks’ trading in Madoff claims, suits by Madoff trustee Irving Picard of Baker Hostetler seemed so promising that claims were trading at 75 cents on the dollar. But according to fascinating new litigation between Deutsche Bank and two Madoff feeder funds, the value of claims has been dropping ever since, and was down to 60 cents on the dollar last month. The billion-dollar declaratory judgment complaint by Kingate Global and Kingate Euro against Deutsche Bank doesn’t offer an explanation for the declining value of Madoff claims. But it’s not much of a leap of inference to guess that U.S. District Judges Jed Rakoff and Colleen McMahon of Manhattan federal district court have more than a little to do with it.

Are big banks now in the clear for allegedly aiding Madoff?

By Alison Frankel
November 2, 2011

Irving Picard has given the bankruptcy laws one hell of a workout. As trustee in the Chapter 7 bankruptcy of Bernard Madoff’s securities firm, Picard, a partner at Baker & Hostetler, has been more aggressive and creative than any bankruptcy trustee in history in his search for defendants to blame for Madoff’s epic Ponzi scheme. His most ambitious gambit, as everyone knows, was a series of megabillion-dollar suits against the international financial institutions that Picard’s team of lawyers at Baker & Hostetler accused of willfully ignoring warnings of Madoff’s fraud.

Mets ruling could upend Madoff bankruptcy

By Alison Frankel
September 28, 2011

Helen Chaitman of Becker & Poliakoff represents more than 300 investors who had accounts with Bernard Madoff. For more than two years she’s hammered away at one particular argument in federal bankruptcy court, in Congress, even on YouTube: Madoff bankruptcy trustee Irving Picard of Baker & Hostetler shouldn’t be allowed to demand the return of profits that Madoff investors pulled out of their accounts as long ago as 2002, six years before the Ponzi scheme imploded in December 2008. On Tuesday night, Chaitman finally found vindication, even though it wasn’t in any of her cases. Manhattan federal judge Jed Rakoff, ruling in Picard’s fraud case against the owners of the New York Mets, concluded that a section of the federal bankruptcy code precludes Picard from attempting to claw back money Madoff investors pulled out of the Ponzi scheme before 2006.

$90 bln answer: Rakoff says Picard has no standing in bank suits

By Alison Frankel
July 29, 2011

In the end, it wasn’t even a close call.

Using words like “conjecture,” “bootstrapping,” and “a stretch,” Manhattan federal court judge Jed Rakoff on Thursday decimated trustee Irving Picard‘s multibillion-dollar campaign against the banks that allegedly helped Bernard Madoff engineer his fraud, in a 26-page opinion that left no room for doubt. Rakoff so thoroughly rejected each and every one of Picard’s arguments for why he had the right to bring common law fraud claims against HSBC and UniCredit that the judge didn’t even cite much legal precedent through the first half of the ruling. He simply applied what he calls “ordinary use of the English language” to conclude that no reading of the relevant laws or cases grants Picard standing to sue the banks for unjust enrichment and aiding and abetting fraud and breach of fiduciary duty. This ruling derived its power — and it is a very powerful opinion — from its simplicity.

Picard drops $2bl in claims against UBS? Um, no, he doesn’t

By Alison Frankel
July 20, 2011

The damages claims in Irving Picard’s pursuit of the banks that allegedly helped Ponzi schemer Bernard Madoff are so outsized that even a simple two-page letter from a federal judge can lead to a $2 billion kerfuffle. On Tuesday, Manhattan federal district court judge Colleen McMahon sent a letter to lawyers for Picard, the bankruptcy trustee for Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities, and to lawyers for UBS, which is a defendant in two of Picard’s suits. UBS’s counsel at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher had moved in June to transfer two Picard suits naming the bank as a defendant out of bankruptcy court and into federal court; Judge McMahon, who is overseeing Picard’s case against JPMorgan Chase, agreed to take the cases on July 7 and began requesting information, by letter, from Picard counsel at Baker & Hostetler and UBS counsel at Gibson Dunn.