Alison Frankel

In powerful Citi ruling, 2nd Circuit stresses deference to SEC

By Alison Frankel
March 16, 2012

When U.S. Senior District Judge Jed Rakoff rejected a $285 million settlement between Citigroup and the Securities and Exchange Commission last fall, he offered a stern rebuke to SEC lawyers who’d suggested his role was not to protect the public interest. “A court, while giving substantial deference to the views of an administrative body vested with authority over a particular area, must still exercise a modicum of independent judgment in determining whether the requested deployment of its injunctive powers will serve, or disserve, the public interest,” Rakoff wrote in his oft-quoted ruling. “Anything less would not only violate the constitutional doctrine of separation of powers but would undermine the independence that is the indispensible attribute of the federal judiciary.”

Why Rakoff dumped Picard’s $60 bln RICO case v. Unicredit

By Alison Frankel
February 23, 2012

Over the last six months, U.S. Senior District Judge Jed Rakoff has made Irving Picard of Baker & Hostetler look more like Don Quixote than a white knight riding to the rescue of investors who lost billions in Bernard Madoff’s Ponzi scheme.

Rakoff: DOJ may have engaged in a ‘shuffle’ in SCOTUS brief

By Alison Frankel
February 13, 2012

The Solicitor General’s office of the Department of Justice is home to some of the smartest lawyers in the country. These are the people who represent the views of the United States in the most important public policy cases at the U.S. Supreme Court. They go on to head appellate practices at prestigious law firms — or to their own seats in the federal judiciary. Lawyers in the SG’s office are accustomed to deference.

Citi’s FINRA deal: Why ‘neither admit nor deny’ isn’t a problem

By Alison Frankel
January 19, 2012

On Wednesday, the Financial Industry Regulatory Authority disclosed a settlement with Citigroup that U.S. Senior Judge Jed Rakoff might find interesting. Citi agreed to pay a $725,000 fine to resolve allegations that it committed thousands of disclosure lapses in research reports issued between January 2007 and March 2010. (A big thanks to my Thomson Reuters colleague Stuart Gittleman of Accelus, who told me about Citi’s FINRA deal.) Among other disclosure problems, Citi failed to note its role as a manager or co-manager of a related public offering in 8 percent of the 80,000 reports it issued annually; it neglected to report investment banking revenue in 330 research reports; and it didn’t disclose its beneficial ownership in about 1,800 companies its analysts covered.

SEC settlement-language change is (at best) mere cosmetics

By Alison Frankel
January 9, 2012

Late Friday the Securities and Exchange Commission confirmed in a statement what the New York Times first reported Friday morning: it has changed its policy on the boilerplate “neither admit nor deny” language in most SEC settlement agreements. But don’t get too excited. The change will affect only cases in which the defendant has admitted guilt or been convicted in a related criminal action. In settlements with those criminal defendants, the SEC will delete “inconsistent” concessions and instead “recite the fact and nature of the criminal conviction or criminal [admission] in the settlement documents.”

Why does Rajit Gupta want the SEC to sue him in federal court?

By Alison Frankel
August 10, 2011

Former Goldman Sachs director Rajat Gupta and his lawyer, Gary Naftalis of Kramer Levin Naftalis & Frankel, declared what might seem to be a very strange kind of victory last week when the Securities and Exchange Commission agreed to drop its administrative proceeding against Gupta. The two-page stipulation between Gupta and the SEC makes it clear that the SEC isn’t giving up on its claims that Gupta engaged in insider trading when he allegedly passed confidential information about Goldman Sachs and Procter & Gamble to Galleon Group hedge fund chief Raj Rajaratnam. All Gupta won was a pledge that the agency will sue him in federal court. And that is indeed a huge victory.

$90 bln answer: Rakoff says Picard has no standing in bank suits

By Alison Frankel
July 29, 2011

In the end, it wasn’t even a close call.

Using words like “conjecture,” “bootstrapping,” and “a stretch,” Manhattan federal court judge Jed Rakoff on Thursday decimated trustee Irving Picard‘s multibillion-dollar campaign against the banks that allegedly helped Bernard Madoff engineer his fraud, in a 26-page opinion that left no room for doubt. Rakoff so thoroughly rejected each and every one of Picard’s arguments for why he had the right to bring common law fraud claims against HSBC and UniCredit that the judge didn’t even cite much legal precedent through the first half of the ruling. He simply applied what he calls “ordinary use of the English language” to conclude that no reading of the relevant laws or cases grants Picard standing to sue the banks for unjust enrichment and aiding and abetting fraud and breach of fiduciary duty. This ruling derived its power — and it is a very powerful opinion — from its simplicity.