Alison Frankel

FHLB demands DOJ draft complaint: ‘What is JPMorgan trying to hide?’

By Alison Frankel
December 10, 2013

If JPMorgan Chase and the Justice Department thought that all the zeroes at the end of the bank’s multibillion-dollar settlement for mortgage securitization failures would foreclose questions about the bank’s actual wrongdoing, clearly they thought wrong. Days after the much-leaked-about $13 billion deal was finally announced, New York Times columnist Gretchen Morgenson looked at the admissions accompanying the settlement and wondered why it had taken the federal government so long to hold the bank accountable for conduct that’s been in the public domain for years. Morgenson’s column echoed posts at Bloomberg and Slate that also scoffed at JPMorgan “admissions.” On Monday, even a commissioner of the Securities and Exchange Commission piled on. Dan Gallagher, a Republican, criticized the settlement as a penalty on the bank’s current shareholders that’s not justified by JPMorgan’s admitted conduct. “It is not rational,” Gallagher told an audience in Frankfurt at an event organized by the American Chamber of Commerce in Germany.

BofA, JPMorgan travel opposite roads to end MBS liability

By Alison Frankel
October 31, 2013

For a change, JPMorgan’s rollercoaster negotiations with state and federal regulators to resolve the bank’s liability for rotten mortgage-backed securities did not make news Wednesday. Has there ever been more public dealmaking between the Justice Department and a target? It feels as though the public has been made privy to every settlement proposal and rejection, as if we’re all watching a soap operatic reality show. Will there be a reunion episode if the bank and the Justice Department end up finalizing the reported $13 billion global settlement, with Eric Holder and Jamie Dimon shouting imprecations at each other?

Don’t get too excited about JPMorgan’s admissions to the SEC

By Alison Frankel
September 19, 2013

The Securities and Exchange Commission was pretty darn pumped about its $200 million settlement Thursday with JPMorgan Chase, part of the bank’s $920 million resolution of regulatory claims stemming from losses in the notorious “London Whale” proprietary trading. And why not? As George Cannellos, the co-director of enforcement, said in a statement, JPMorgan’s $200 million civil penalty is one of the largest in SEC history. The agency also showed that it’s serious about its new policy of demanding admissions of liability from some defendants. For those of us accustomed to the SEC’s “neither admit nor deny” boilerplate, it’s startling to see the words “publicly acknowledging that it violated the federal securities laws” in an SEC settlement announcement. So let’s permit Cannellos some chest-thumping: “The SEC required JPMorgan to admit the facts in the SEC’s order – and acknowledge that it broke the law – because JPMorgan’s egregious breakdowns in controls and governance put its millions of shareholders at risk and resulted in inaccurate public filings.”

How long did JPMorgan (allegedly) deceive investors?

By Alison Frankel
August 19, 2013

Last week’s criminal complaints against former JPMorgan Chase derivatives traders Javier Martin-Artajo and Julien Grout – who allegedly mismarked positions in the bank’s infamous synthetic credit derivatives portfolio to hide hundreds of millions of dollars of trading losses in early 2012 by the JPMorgan Chief Investment Office – does not directly impact the shareholder class action under way in federal court in Manhattan. But you can be sure that the plaintiffs firms leading the class action were gratified that the Manhattan U.S. Attorney has decided the so-called “London Whale” losses merit criminal charges. When U.S. District Judge George Daniels hears arguments next month on the bank’s motion to dismiss the class action, shareholder lawyers will absolutely remind him that prosecutors believe a criminal cover-up took place. JPMorgan’s lawyers at Sullivan & Cromwell moved in June to dismiss the entire shareholder class action, but as I’ve said before, I don’t think there’s much chance Judge Daniels will toss claims based on bank officials’ statements about the London Whale losses. The government’s new criminal charges make that prospect even more remote.

What, us worry? Banks’ 3Q earnings downplay litigation exposure

By Alison Frankel
October 14, 2012

As I read the just-released third-quarter earnings statements of JPMorgan Chase and Wells Fargo, I felt as though I were living in a parallel universe to the banks. Looking for any mention of the New York attorney general’s encompassing $22 billion Martin Act suit against JPMorgan in the bank’s statement? You won’t find it. The only question on the AG’s case that JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon fielded in the Friday morning call with analysts was a softball asking whether, as a policy matter, it’s fair to hold the bank responsible for the alleged sins of Bear Stearns when the Fed pushed JPMorgan into the acquisition; Dimon, you will be shocked to hear, agreed that that’s not good policy. No one on the analyst call asked — and the bank didn’t say anything — about Libor liability or about the ongoing securities fraud class action stemming from JPMorgan’s nearly $6 billion chief investment office derivative hedge losses.

Lead counsel contests take shape in Facebook, JPMorgan cases

By Alison Frankel
July 26, 2012

Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossmann and Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd are the most successful members of the securities class action bar. Check the ISS rankings for 2011: Bernstein Litowitz is in the top slot, with $1.37 billion in settlements last year; Robbins Geller is second, with $1.14 billion. Those total dollars, though, mask the very different business models of the two firms, which are reflected in two other numbers on the ISS chart. Bernstein Litowitz settled only 13 cases in 2011, for an average settlement of about $106 million. By contrast, Robbins Geller settled 28 – more than twice as many as Bernstein Litowitz and 12 more than any other leading class action firm. Robbins Geller’s average settlement was about $49 million, less than any firm in the top 10 except Milberg. Both models work, or you wouldn’t always see Bernstein Litowitz and Robbins Geller at the top of the ISS rankings, but the firms are the yin and yang of securities class action litigation.

JPMorgan class action may hinge on when alleged fraud began

By Alison Frankel
June 19, 2012

The last time I wrote about the securities fraud class action claims against JPMorgan Chase for the losses it suffered in risky credit default swaps, I told you to pay attention to the unusually short class period alleged in the early complaints. The first couple of filings claimed the bank’s deception of investors began on April 13 – the day JPMorgan CEO Jamie Dimon told analysts that news reports about the dangerous trading position of its chief investment office were a “tempest in a teapot” – and ended on May 10, when the bank disclosed the initial $2 billion loss of the “London Whale.”

Why plaintiffs’ lawyers would rather sue Facebook than JPMorgan

By Alison Frankel
May 25, 2012

Securities class action lawyers have short attention spans. It was only last week, after all, that JPMorgan Chase and its $2 billion (and counting) loss on its credit default swap hedge was the topic of the moment. Plaintiffs’ lawyers and their institutional clients were figuring out whether they bought the bank’s shares in the one-month period between CEO Jamie Dimon telling analysts that the hedge was a “tempest in a teapot” and Dimon disclosing the initial $2 billion loss. But after an initial flurry of filings and press releases about the JPMorgan case, this week has brought no additional complaints against the bank – even as the impact of JPMorgan’s hedge ripples through credit markets and regulatory debate.

Where are institutional investors in JPMorgan securities cases?

By Alison Frankel
May 18, 2012

The key detail in the two securities-fraud complaints filed so far against JPMorgan Chase isn’t that CEO Jamie Dimon told analysts that news reports about the bank’s risky credit default swap position were a “tempest in a teapot.” Even though that’s the statement both complaints pinpoint as best evidence so far of the bank’s alleged deception, to understand the shape this litigation is likely to take, you have to check out the class period both complaints (here and here) assert. It’s unusually short for a securities class action, beginning on Apr. 13 – when Dimon made the fateful “tempest” comment – and ending on May 10, the day the bank disclosed losses of $2 billion in CDS trades, with more to come.

Suing JPMorgan over MBS? Say thanks to bond insurers

By Alison Frankel
January 26, 2012

Attention everyone who’s suing or planning to sue JPMorgan Chase, Bear Stearns, or Bear’s onetime mortgage unit EMC over mortgage-backed securities gone bad: Those indefatigable bond insurers are busy amassing whistleblower evidence for you. Last Friday, Patterson Belknap Webb & Tyler — which represents the monolines Syncora, Assured Guaranty, and Ambac in fraud and breach-of-contract suits stemming from EMC mortgages — began deposing witnesses from outside companies that evaluated the underlying loans in Bear’s mortgage-backed offerings. (The Nov. 18 amended complaint in Assured’s Manhattan federal court case against EMC and JPMorgan outlines the whistleblower assertions Patterson has come up with.)