In August, when Johnson & Johnson disclosed its deal to resolve criminal allegations that it falsely marketed the potent schizophrenic drug Risperdal, I said that if ever a board was ripe for a big, fat shareholder derivative suit, it was J&J’s. The Risperdal settlement was the company’s third criminal plea in a little more than a year, on top of a Justice Department and Food and Drug Administration investigation of its over-the-counter children’s drugs, state attorneys general subpoenas, whistleblower suits, and product recalls. The 111-page consolidated complaint that Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossmann and Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd filed against J&J’s board members last December offered more red flags than a training school for toreadors.