Alison Frankel

SCOTUS Libor case, by itself, won’t revive antitrust claims

By Alison Frankel
July 1, 2014

Don’t get too excited about the news Monday that the U.S. Supreme Court has agreed to hear the appeal of bond investors whose antitrust claims against the global banks involved in the Libor-setting process were tossed last year.

Don’t get too excited about JPMorgan’s admissions to the SEC

By Alison Frankel
September 19, 2013

The Securities and Exchange Commission was pretty darn pumped about its $200 million settlement Thursday with JPMorgan Chase, part of the bank’s $920 million resolution of regulatory claims stemming from losses in the notorious “London Whale” proprietary trading. And why not? As George Cannellos, the co-director of enforcement, said in a statement, JPMorgan’s $200 million civil penalty is one of the largest in SEC history. The agency also showed that it’s serious about its new policy of demanding admissions of liability from some defendants. For those of us accustomed to the SEC’s “neither admit nor deny” boilerplate, it’s startling to see the words “publicly acknowledging that it violated the federal securities laws” in an SEC settlement announcement. So let’s permit Cannellos some chest-thumping: “The SEC required JPMorgan to admit the facts in the SEC’s order – and acknowledge that it broke the law – because JPMorgan’s egregious breakdowns in controls and governance put its millions of shareholders at risk and resulted in inaccurate public filings.”

What remains of Libor litigation with antitrust, RICO knocked out?

By Alison Frankel
April 1, 2013

Make no mistake: A 161-page ruling late Friday by the New York federal court judge overseeing private litigation stemming from manipulation of the benchmark London Interbank Offered Rate (Libor) has devastated investor claims that they were the victims of artificially suppressed Libor rates. U.S. District Judge Naomi Reice Buchwald of Manhattan ruled that owners of fixed and floating-rate securities do not have standing to bring antitrust claims against the banks that participated in the Libor rate-setting process, even though some of those banks have admitted to collusion in megabucks settlements with regulators. If that result, which Buchwald herself called “incongruous,” weren’t bad enough, the judge also cut off an alternative route to treble damages for supposed Libor victims when she held that federal racketeering claims of fraud by the panel banks are precluded under two different defense theories.

Get ready for plaintiffs’ lawyer brawl over Libor class actions

By Alison Frankel
July 30, 2012

On Friday, plaintiffs’ lawyers at Pomerantz Haudek Grossman & Gross filed the latest class action related to banks’ alleged manipulation of the London interbank offered rate, or Libor, an interest-rate benchmark that affects trillions of dollars of securities. The new complaint, filed in federal court in Manhattan on behalf of Berkshire Bank, asserts claims for all New York financial institutions that “originated, purchased outright or purchased a participation in” loans paying interest rates pegged to Libor.

Barclays hit with Libor securities class action

By Alison Frankel
July 13, 2012

There’s a new entry in the category of no-brainers: A holder of Barclays American Depository Receipts has brought the first of what is sure to be a string of Libor-related securities fraud class actions. The 47-page complaint, filed by Wolf Haldenstein Adler Freeman & Herz in federal court in Manhattan, asserts that Barclays and its former CEO, Bob Diamond, and outgoing chairman, Marcus Agius, lied to shareholders when they failed to disclose the bank’s manipulation of reports to the authorities who calculate the daily London interbank offered rate (or Libor), a benchmark for short-term interest rates.