Alison Frankel

Delaware judge OKs forum selection clause adopted on same day as deal

By Alison Frankel
September 9, 2014

Chancellor Andre Bouchard of Delaware Chancery Court struck a double blow Monday for corporations that want to restrict shareholder litigation to a single jurisdiction. In a decision upholding the validity of a bylaw requiring shareholders of First Citizens Bancshares to sue board members only in North Carolina, Bouchard ruled that Delaware corporations can designate venues other than Delaware as the exclusive forum for shareholder claims – an issue of first impression in Chancery Court. But that wasn’t all. Bouchard also rejected shareholder arguments that First Citizens’ forum selection clause can’t be enforced because it was enacted on the same day that the North Carolina bank announced its $676 million acquisition of a related First Citizens entity in South Carolina.

Why Parmalat litigation v. Grant Thornton is like 0-0 soccer game

By Alison Frankel
June 26, 2014

If it is possible for an appellate ruling on the jurisdiction of bankruptcy trustees’ claims against an auditor to be snicker-inducing, Judge Richard Posner‘s opinion Wednesday for the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Parmalat v. Grant Thornton is that decision.

Forum selection clauses are killing multiforum M&A litigation

By Alison Frankel
June 24, 2014

It was entirely predictable that last spring, after Safeway announced that it had agreed to accept a $9.2 billion offer from the private equity firm Cerberus Capital, shareholders would rush to file suits challenging the deal. As you know, shareholder M&A suits have become an inevitable consequence of merger announcements, and, to the frustration of defendants, are often brought in more than one jurisdiction — which has meant, in years past, that if defendants couldn’t persuade judges to defer to other courts, they sometimes had to defend against the same claims by multiple plaintiffs firms in multiple courts.

Lesson from the smartphone wars: Litigation is not a business plan

By Alison Frankel
May 19, 2014

After almost five years of suing each other in courts in the United States and Europe over patents on mobile devices, Apple and Google abruptly announced Friday night that they’ve called a ceasefire: They’re dropping all of the litigation. They’re not even making a deal to cross-license one another’s IP, just declaring a truce and walking away.

Can banks force clients to litigate, not arbitrate?

By Alison Frankel
April 3, 2014

If you are a customer of a big bank — let’s say a merchant unhappy about the fees you’re being charged to process credit card transactions — good luck trying to bring claims in federal court when you’re subject to an arbitration provision. As you probably recall, in last term’s opinion in American Express v. Italian Colors, the U.S. Supreme Court continued its genuflection at the altar of the Federal Arbitration Act, holding definitively that if you’ve signed an agreement requiring you to arbitrate your claims, you’re stuck with it even if you can’t afford to vindicate your statutory rights via individual arbitration.

Halliburton alert! New briefs argue Congress never endorsed Basic

By Alison Frankel
January 7, 2014

Last February, when Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Samuel Alito of the U.S. Supreme Court sided with the court’s liberal wing in Amgen v. Connecticut Retirement Plans, they joined an opinion that left intact the standard for certification of a class of securities fraud plaintiffs. Amgen, as you probably recall, had asked the court to impose a requirement that shareholders prove the materiality of supposed corporate misrepresentations in order to win class certification. The majority refused, in a decision written by Justice Ruth Ginsburg. Among other things, Justice Ginsburg said that if Congress had wanted to tinker with the Supreme Court’s 1988 precedent on securities class certification, Basic v. Levinson, it could have done so in 1995, when lawmakers passed the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act, or again in 1998, when the Securities Litigation Uniform Standards Act became law. Instead, Justice Ginsburg wrote in Amgen, “Congress rejected calls to undo the fraud-on-the-market presumption of classwide reliance endorsed in Basic.”

Kiobel brief shows State/DOJ split over human rights litigation

By Alison Frankel
June 15, 2012

When John Bellinger of Arnold & Porter was the legal adviser to the State Department in the administration of George W. Bush, the Justice Department filed about a dozen amicus briefs addressing the Alien Tort Statute, a 1789 law that has become a modern vehicle for international human rights litigation. Bellinger told me on Thursday that he signed every one. When foreign nationals use the ATS to bring cases in U.S. courts for conduct that took place overseas, foreign policy is implicated, and the State Department wants a voice. That’s why Bellinger believes it’s so significant that when the Justice Department filed its new amicus brief in the reformulated Kiobel v. Royal Dutch Petroleum case at the U.S. Supreme Court, State Department legal adviser Harold Koh did not sign it.