Alison Frankel

News Corp deal: a new way to police corporate political spending?

By Alison Frankel
April 22, 2013

On Monday, the directors and officers of Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp agreed to settle a derivative suit accusing them of breaching their duty to shareholders by failing to avert the phone-hacking scandal at the company’s British newspapers. News Corp’s insurers will pay $139 million, in what shareholder lawyers atGrant & Eisenhofer called the largest-ever cash settlement of derivative claims in Delaware Chancery Court. The settlement, which comes as News Corp prepares to split its news and entertainment branches into two publicly traded companies, was produced after several months of mediation that took place while the company’s motion to dismiss was pending before Vice Chancellor John Noble.

News Corp and the FCPA paradox

By Alison Frankel
February 28, 2012

For the Justice Department’s Foreign Corrupt Practices prosecutors, last week was the best of times and the worst of times. A federal judge in Houston sentenced the former CEO of the Halliburton spin-off KBR Inc. to 30 months in prison for his role in a 10-year scheme to pay $182 million in bribes to Nigerian officials in order to secure $6 billion in military oil and gas contracts. Albert Stanley’s sentencing marked the end of one of the DOJ’s most successful FCPA prosecutions, in which KBR agreed to pay $579 million in criminal fines and disgorged profits — the second-highest fine in an FCPA case at the time the guilty plea and Securities and Exchange Commission settlement was announced in 2009. The KBR case is an FCPA paradigm, a classic demonstration of the law’s power to expose and punish corruption that would otherwise have stayed in the shadows.

Who gets to sue News Corp?

By Alison Frankel
July 19, 2011

Well, here’s a big shocker: Grant & Eisenhofer and Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossmann aren’t the only shareholders’ firms that think Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp is ripe for the picking. It’s been a little more than a week since G&E and Bernstein amended the complaint in their already-underway Delaware Chancery Court shareholder derivative suit against the News Corp board to include allegations from the British phone-hacking and bribe-paying scandal. Turns out that’s plenty of time for other shareholder lawyers to fire up their word processors and lodge their own complaints.