Alison Frankel

Marc Becker’s sad tale: Casualty of BofA attack on Quinn Emanuel

By Alison Frankel
December 7, 2011

Late Tuesday, U.S. District Judge Barbara Jones of Manhattan federal court denied Bank of America’s motion to disqualify Quinn Emanuel Urquhart & Sullivan from representing AIG in its $10 billion mortgage-backed securities case against BofA, Merrill, and other bank subsidiaries. BofA’s lawyers at Munger, Tolles & Olson had argued that a former Munger partner, Marc Becker, acquired confidential information about Merrill’s MBS litigation strategy before departing to join Quinn Emanuel in 2008, then proceeded to work on AIG’s case against BofA and Merrill. The judge faulted Quinn’s screening process for failing to identify Becker’s potential conflict. But she said Becker had performed only non-substantive editorial work on AIG’s complaint and remand motion, didn’t share any confidences, and took steps to segregate himself from the AIG case as soon as he was reminded of his previous work for Merrill Lynch and its former mortgage unit. “There is no meaningful showing here that the trial process will be tainted,” Jones wrote. “The court finds that it would be unduly prejudicial to disqualify Quinn.”

Quinn Emanuel is not riding an MBS wave: it triggered a tsunami

By Alison Frankel
September 2, 2011

The Federal Housing Finance Agency’s reported mortgage-backed securities suits against a slew of major banks haven’t yet been filed. But if you want to know what they’re likely to look like, check out Mass Mutual’s 168-page MBS complaint against Bank of America, Merrill Lynch, Bear Stearns, and J.P. Morgan, filed Thursday. (It’s so big the Massachusetts federal court docket split it into four parts: here, here, here and here.) Or you could look at AIG’s $10 billion megasuit against BofA, Countrywide, and Merrill, filed on Aug. 8, or Allstate’s 114-page complaint against Goldman Sachs on Aug. 15, or U.S. Bank’s MBS breach of contract suit against BofA, which came at the beginning of this week.

2011: A Samsung litigation odyssey

By Alison Frankel
August 24, 2011

As all the world knows, Samsung is engaged in a do-or-die international patent battle with Apple. On Wednesday alone, Samsung saw a court in the Netherlands enjoin it from infringing an Apple smartphone patent; planned for an injunction hearing in Germany, where a court enjoined the Samsung Galaxy Tab, then lifted the preliminary injunction; and went before Judge Lucy Koh in San Jose federal court, where Apple is demanding yet another injunction barring Samsung devices.

Google’s Motorola deal is good news for Quinn Emanuel

By Alison Frankel
August 15, 2011

There are all sorts of questions out there about Google’s $12.5 billion acquisition of Motorola Mobility. What will the deal mean for HTC and Samsung, the other cellphone makers using the Android platform? Will the merger force Microsoft to make a bid for Nokia? And is Carl Icahn, Motorola’s biggest shareholder, finally satisfied? I’ll leave it to others to ruminate on all that. I’m interested, as always, in what this deal means for lawyers.

On a very dark day, BofA’s dim ray of hope

By Alison Frankel
August 9, 2011

Monday was (another) dreadful day for Bank of America. The bank’s shares closed at a two-year low, thanks in part to AIG’s double whammy: a $10 billion fraud suit against BofA and the insurer’s simultaneous motion to intervene in opposition to BofA’s proposed $8.5 billion settlement with Countrywide mortgage-backed securities noteholders. Bank of America and Countrywide’s securitization trustee, Bank of New York Mellon, thought the $8.5 billion deal would put their MBS woes behind them. Instead the proposed settlement seems to have made the two banks into bigger targets than they were before reaching an agreement with 22 big MBS investors.

Tale of two defendants: HTC, Nokia fates diverged in Apple case

By Alison Frankel
July 18, 2011

Back in March 2010, Apple filed separate suits at the U.S. International Trade Commission against Nokia and HTC, accusing both cellphone makers of infringing Apple’s smartphone patents. In April, the ITC staff recommended that the patents Apple had asserted against both Nokia and HTC should be tested in a consolidated case. Nokia and HTC supported the proposal. Apple’s lawyers at Kirkland & Ellis complained that the partial consolidation would aid Nokia and HTC by creating “complexity and delay,” but the lawyers didn’t fight hard against it because they didn’t want the case — which had the potential to knock iPhone competitors out of the U.S. market — to get bogged down.