Opinion

Alison Frankel

$90 bln answer: Rakoff says Picard has no standing in bank suits

Alison Frankel
Jul 29, 2011 19:57 UTC

In the end, it wasn’t even a close call.

Using words like “conjecture,” “bootstrapping,” and “a stretch,” Manhattan federal court judge Jed Rakoff on Thursday decimated trustee Irving Picard‘s multibillion-dollar campaign against the banks that allegedly helped Bernard Madoff engineer his fraud, in a 26-page opinion that left no room for doubt. Rakoff so thoroughly rejected each and every one of Picard’s arguments for why he had the right to bring common law fraud claims against HSBC and UniCredit that the judge didn’t even cite much legal precedent through the first half of the ruling. He simply applied what he calls “ordinary use of the English language” to conclude that no reading of the relevant laws or cases grants Picard standing to sue the banks for unjust enrichment and aiding and abetting fraud and breach of fiduciary duty. This ruling derived its power — and it is a very powerful opinion — from its simplicity.

Rakoff’s ruling immediately affected Picard’s $6.6 billion case against HSBC and a parallel $2.2 billion case against UniCredit. But it’s going to have huge repercussions beyond those suits. Judge Rakoff is also presiding over Picard’s $60 billion racketeering case against UniCredit and related defendants, and it’s a certainty that UniCredit’s lawyers at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom will ask the judge to apply his ruling on Picard’s standing and bounce that suit as well.

Meanwhile, Judge Colleen McMahon, who is Judge Rakoff’s neighbor on the 14th floor of the Manhattan federal courthouse, is poised to rule on Picard’s standing in his common-law suits against UBS and JPMorgan Chase. McMahon is certainly an independent-minded judge so it would be a mistake to assume she’ll simply follow Rakoff’s lead. But Rakoff knew full well how intensely his ruling on Picard’s standing would be scrutinized, and nevertheless showed no equivocation in his opinion. It’s hard to imagine Judge McMahon reaching a contrary conclusion.

If McMahon — and, ultimately, the appellate courts — agree with Rakoff, Picard’s audacious attempt to hold the banks responsible for failing to end Madoff’s Ponzi scheme is doomed. As I reported a few weeks back, Picard’s standing to bring common-law claims against the banks is a threshold issue. To prosecute a suit, you have to be able to show that you were injured. Picard, as the bankruptcy trustee in the Madoff Chapter 11, stands in the shoes of the debtor, Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities. But his common-law claims against the banks weren’t brought on behalf of Madoff’s now-defunct investment company — which, as Rakoff explained in Thursday’s ruling, is barred from suing alleged co-conspirators like the banks by a doctrine called in pari delicto. Instead, Picard’s lawyers at Baker & Hostetler said they were bringing claims against the banks on behalf of Madoff’s customers, who lost billions when Madoff’s scheme was exposed.

HSBC’s lawyers at Cleary Gottlieb Steen & Hamilton and UniCredit’s Skadden counsel countered that as bankruptcy trustee, Picard has no right to stand in the shoes of Madoff’s customers.

Who gets to sue News Corp?

Alison Frankel
Jul 19, 2011 22:33 UTC

Well, here’s a big shocker: Grant & Eisenhofer and Bernstein Litowitz Berger & Grossmann aren’t the only shareholders’ firms that think Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp is ripe for the picking. It’s been a little more than a week since G&E and Bernstein amended the complaint in their already-underway Delaware Chancery Court shareholder derivative suit against the News Corp board to include allegations from the British phone-hacking and bribe-paying scandal. Turns out that’s plenty of time for other shareholder lawyers to fire up their word processors and lodge their own complaints.

On Friday, a Massachusetts union pension fund represented by Labaton Sucharow filed a Delaware derivative suit. And on Monday, Manhattan federal court docketed a derivative complaint filed by Glancy Binkow & Goldberg on behalf of an individual News Corp shareholder. So now what? Who gets to control the shareholder litigation against Murdoch’s embattled company?

There’s no clear answer to that question, which means we may be in for a tussle between the Delaware and New York plaintiffs firms. As I mentioned in a post yesterday, Chancery Court judges are increasingly irritated that shareholders are filing mergers and acquisition and corporate governance suits in courts outside of Delaware. But there’s no formal framework for determining where cases like this should proceed. (That’s in contrast to federal securities class actions, in which the litigation process is strictly governed by the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act.)

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