Alison Frankel

S&P: State AGs trying to usurp federal regulation of rating agencies

By Alison Frankel
April 8, 2013

Over the next few weeks, federal courts in more than a dozen states are going to begin to consider a very interesting question: Does coordination between and among state attorneys general and the U.S. Department of Justice constitute an improper attempt to override federal regulation?

New brief: Morgan Stanley, rating agencies conspired on 2007 SIV

By Alison Frankel
October 10, 2012

A few months ago, plaintiffs’ lawyers at Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd created quite a stir when they filed thousands of pages of deposition transcripts and other juicy discovery in an investors’ fraud case against Morgan Stanley, Standard & Poor’s and Moody’s. The documents — exhibits to the investors’ summary judgment motion — included never-before-seen internal communications between Morgan Stanley and the rating agencies as they worked on a structured investment vehicle known as Cheyne, putting on public display the allegedly half-cocked evaluations that Moody’s and S&P performed in 2005, when they were swamped with subprime mortgage-backed financial instruments to rate.

Angry about possible U.S. downgrade? Don’t bother suing raters

By Alison Frankel
August 2, 2011

With U.S. markets fretting Tuesday at the prospect of a downgrade in the government’s triple-A credit rating, you may be wondering: Who can we sue? Litigation, after all, is practically an unalienable American right. The problem, however, is that any attempt to sue the credit rating agencies for downgrading U.S. securities will run smack into the Bill of Rights. The rating agencies, as many a disgruntled mortgage-backed securities investor has discovered in the last few years, are shielded from liability because their ratings are considered to be public opinion protected by the First Amendment of the U.S. Constitution.