Alison Frankel

UBS ‘likely’ to settle with FHFA before January trial: bank co-defendants

By Alison Frankel
July 17, 2013

Remember UBS’s attempt to play what it considered a get-out-of-jail-free card in the megabillions litigation over mortgage-backed securities UBS and more than a dozen other banks sold to Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac? UBS’s lawyers at Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom came up with an argument that could have decimated claims against all of the banks: When Congress passed the Housing and Economic Recovery Act of 2008 and established the Federal Housing Finance Agency as a conservator for Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, UBS said, lawmakers explicitly extended the one-year statute of limitations on federal securities claims – but neglected to extend, or even mention, the three-year statute of repose. UBS argued that FHFA’s suits, which in the aggregate asserted claims on more than $300 billion in MBS, were untimely because they were filed after the statute of repose expired.

2nd Circuit delivers more bad news for sophisticated investors

By Alison Frankel
April 23, 2012

Remember U.S. District Judge Victor Marrero‘s opus last month in a hedge fund case against Goldman Sachs? The Manhattan federal judge refused to dismiss claims that Goldman duped the fund, Dodona, into investing in doomed-to-fail Hudson collateralized debt obligations. In 64 vivid pages, Marrero detailed the fund’s allegations that Goldman engaged in a sweeping effort, initiated by CFO David Viniar, to shed its exposure to subprime mortgages — and simultaneously to take advantage of clients who were slower to perceive the looming collapse of the mortgage-backed securities market. Marrero described the alleged scheme as “not only reckless, but bordering on cynical.”

Bond insurers drop MBS letter bomb on UBS

By Alison Frankel
December 2, 2011

Last month, as U.S. banks began reporting their third-quarter financials, I noted that the banks had beefed up their disclosure of potential liability for mortgage-backed securities activity. Morgan Stanley revealed that it had received a demand letter from Gibbs & Bruns, the firm that represents the big funds that negotiated the proposed $8.5 billion MBS breach-of-contract settlement with Bank of America. Goldman upped its reported MBS exposure to $15.8 billion, from a mere $485 million in the second quarter. The new emphasis on disclosure, I said, was partly the result of more claims, but also partly due to pressure from the Securities and Exchange Commission and the Public Company Accounting Oversight Board to improve MBS disclosures.

Picard drops $2bl in claims against UBS? Um, no, he doesn’t

By Alison Frankel
July 20, 2011

The damages claims in Irving Picard’s pursuit of the banks that allegedly helped Ponzi schemer Bernard Madoff are so outsized that even a simple two-page letter from a federal judge can lead to a $2 billion kerfuffle. On Tuesday, Manhattan federal district court judge Colleen McMahon sent a letter to lawyers for Picard, the bankruptcy trustee for Bernard L. Madoff Investment Securities, and to lawyers for UBS, which is a defendant in two of Picard’s suits. UBS’s counsel at Gibson, Dunn & Crutcher had moved in June to transfer two Picard suits naming the bank as a defendant out of bankruptcy court and into federal court; Judge McMahon, who is overseeing Picard’s case against JPMorgan Chase, agreed to take the cases on July 7 and began requesting information, by letter, from Picard counsel at Baker & Hostetler and UBS counsel at Gibson Dunn.