Alison Frankel

Disgraced plaintiffs’ lawyer Gary Friedman on why his leaks shouldn’t topple the largest antitrust settlement in U.S. history

By Alison Frankel
September 29, 2015

(Reuters) – At last, Gary Friedman has decided to explain himself.

Friedman, in case you don’t remember his name, is the antitrust plaintiffs lawyer whose life was pitched into chaos in December, when his old friend Keila Ravelo was arrested for allegedly defrauding her client MasterCard and two law firms where she had been a partner, Willkie Farr & Gallagher and Hunton & Williams.

Ex-MasterCard lawyer now helping opponents of $5.7 billion antitrust deal

By Alison Frankel
September 2, 2015

(Reuters) – Keila Ravelo, the notorious onetime partner at Willkie Farr & Gallagher and Hunton & Williams, spent nearly a decade advising her mainstay client MasterCard in a gigantic antitrust class action by retailers accusing MasterCard and Visa of conspiring to fix swipe fees for card users. She brought the case with her from Hunton to Willkie when she changed firms, and though she was not MasterCard’s lead lawyer in the case, she worked closely with MasterCard on managing the massive document production and management the litigation demanded. She also attended the mediation and negotiating sessions that culminated in final approval of a $5.7 billion class action settlement in December 2013. In many ways, that settlement was the capstone of Keila Ravelo’s legal career.

Does lawyer misconduct taint Amex, MasterCard antitrust settlements?

By Alison Frankel
July 30, 2015

(Reuters) – We may never really understand why plaintiffs’ lawyer Gary Friedman of the Friedman Law Group sabotaged his own promising career by secretly disclosing a trove of privileged and confidential documents from his antitrust class action against American Express to Keila Ravelo, MasterCard’s counsel in a parallel class action against Visa and MasterCard. But thanks to filings Wednesday in the Amex case, we now know the breathtaking scope of Friedman’s improper disclosures, which Hofstra law professor Roy Simon described in an expert witness report as the most “repeated and serious violations” of professional duties that he can recall in 20 years of advising class counsel.

New brief heats up fight over $7 billion credit card settlement

By Alison Frankel
July 25, 2012

Last Friday, when lawyers from three firms – Robins, Kaplan, Miller & Ciresi, Robbins Geller Rudman & Dowd and Berger & Montague – asked to withdraw as counsel to the National Association of Convenience Stores in the proposed $7 billion antitrust class action settlement with Visa and MasterCard, they said that they only learned of NACS’s opposition to the deal right before the settlement was filed with U.S. District Judge John Gleeson in Brooklyn. That’s not what NACS’s new lawyers at Constantine Cannon said in a brief filed Tuesday night. If there was any doubt that there’s going to be a battle royal over this settlement, the new brief should remove it.