Senior Correspondent, Kabul
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Feb 7, 2011

Khodorkovsky case: review yes, overturn no-Kremlin

MOSCOW (Reuters) – Foreign experts could be invited by the Kremlin to look into the case of jailed ex-tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky but his verdict will not be overturned, President Dmitry Medvedev’s human rights council said on Monday.

Khodorkovsky, in jail since 2003, was sentenced in December to six more years behind bars after what his supporters said was a politically motivated theft and money-laundering trial. The United States has sharply criticised the decision.

Feb 2, 2011
via FaithWorld

Battle for alcohol in Muslim Russia is deadly business

Photo

(Men drink vodka in a car in Ingushetia's largest town Nazran, January 30, 2011/Diana Markosian)

A masked guard clad in camouflage pokes his AK-47 rifle into the shoulder of a vodka-guzzling client in a hotel bar in Russia’s Muslim Ingushetia region, and orders him to leave immediately. The state-employed security guard then leads the man and his coterie of quiet revelers out of the dimly lit bar.

Feb 2, 2011

Feature – Battle for alcohol in Muslim Russia is deadly business

NAZRAN, Russia (Reuters) – A masked guard clad in camouflage pokes his AK-47 rifle into the shoulder of a vodka-guzzling client in a hotel bar in Russia’s Muslim Ingushetia region, and orders him to leave immediately.

The state-employed security guard then leads the man and his coterie of quiet revellers out of the dimly lit bar.

Jan 31, 2011

In Russia’s Muslim south, insurgency gains strength

NAZRAN, Russia (Reuters) – Neiba scrapes out a meager income selling soil-caked clumps of wild garlic she picks in the forests of Russia’s poorest province — an occupation a growing Islamic insurgency has made increasingly hazardous.

“I will only go to the forest with my husband, and even then, we are terrified every time,” said Neiba, 43, as she adjusted her bright red hijab at the sprawling outdoor market in Nazran, Ingushetia’s largest town. “What if we see a rebel?”

Jan 27, 2011

Russian region head blames bomb on Caucasus rebels

MAGAS, Russia (Reuters) – Islamist insurgents from the North Caucasus were behind a suicide bomb attack that killed 35 people at Russia’s busiest airport, the head of the mainly Muslim province of Ingushetia said Thursday.

Ingush leader Yunus-Bek Yevkurov, who heads an impoverished region neighbouring Chechnya, is the most senior Russian official to blame insurgents publicly for Monday’s attack on Moscow’s Domodedovo airport.

Jan 26, 2011

Putin says airport bomb not linked to Chechnya

MOSCOW (Reuters) – Prime Minister Vladimir Putin said on Wednesday that those behind a deadly suicide attack on Russia’s busiest airport were unlikely to be from Chechnya, but analysts and media said North Caucasus militants were to blame.

No one has yet claimed responsibility for the Monday attack which killed 35 and injured 100, including foreigners, and which bore the hallmark of Islamist rebels.

Jan 26, 2011

Airport bomb targets Russia’s pitch to investors

MOSCOW (Reuters) – A suicide bombing in the arrivals hall of Moscow’s main airport suggests Islamist militants have a new target — the Kremlin’s bid to attract foreign investors.

Monday’s attack ripped through crowds at Domodedovo, the country’s busiest airport, just two days before President Dmitry Medvedev pitches Russia to the world’s business elite at Davos.

Jan 25, 2011

Analysis: Airport bomb targets Russia’s pitch to investors

MOSCOW (Reuters) – A suicide bombing in the arrivals hall of Moscow’s main airport suggests Islamist militants have a new target — the Kremlin’s bid to attract foreign investors.

Monday’s attack ripped through crowds at Domodedovo, the country’s busiest airport, just two days before President Dmitry Medvedev pitches Russia to the world’s business elite at Davos.

Jan 25, 2011

Special report: In Russia, a glut of heroin and denial

TVER, RUSSIA (Reuters) – In her one-room flat, as a small shelf of porcelain cats looks on and the smell of mold hangs in the air, Zoya pulls down the left shoulder of her black blouse and readies herself for her next hit.

A friend and ex-addict uses a lighter to heat a dark, pebble-like lump of Afghan heroin in a tiny glass jar, mixes it with filtered water and injects it into Zoya’s shoulder. The 44-year-old widow is a wreck: HIV-positive, overweight and diabetic. After 12 years of dealing and drug abuse, the veins in her forearms and feet are covered in bloody scabs and abscesses, too weak and sore to take fresh injections.

Jan 25, 2011

In Russia, a glut of heroin and denial

TVER, RUSSIA (Reuters) – In her one-room flat, as a small shelf of porcelain cats looks on and the smell of mould hangs in the air, Zoya pulls down the left shoulder of her black blouse and readies herself for her next hit.

A friend and ex-addict uses a lighter to heat a dark, pebble-like lump of Afghan heroin in a tiny glass jar, mixes it with filtered water and injects it into Zoya’s shoulder. The 44-year-old widow is a wreck: HIV-positive, overweight and diabetic. After 12 years of dealing and drug abuse, the veins in her forearms and feet are covered in bloody scabs and abscesses, too weak and sore to take fresh injections.

    • About Amie

      "Based in Kabul, Amie reports on the NATO-led war in Afghanistan. She was previously based in Moscow, where she reported across the former Soviet Union for almost five years, covering energy, politics and lifestyle stories. For over two years there, she focused on the Islamist insurgency in Russia's Muslim North Caucasus. She has also reported in Greece and Britain."
      Hometown:
      London
      Joined Reuters:
      September 2006
      Languages:
      English, Russian, Italian
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