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Nov 12, 2010
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The deficit commission and tax reform

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The last time this country had major tax reform was almost 25 years ago, in 1986. Could the national deficit commission’s proposals for tax reform result in major change, or will they end up consigned to the history bin of tax ideas that went nowhere?

As everyone knows, taxes are already in flux this year with the debate over whether to extend the Bush tax cuts or let them expire, and especially whether they should be extended for the richest Americans. But the tax issues under discussion—as hotly debated as they’ve been—are minor compared with the bold tax reform proposals released Wednesday by the national deficit commission co-chairs Alan Simpson and Erskine Bowles.

Oct 29, 2010
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Roth IRA conversions: Switch now to avoid higher taxes

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If you’ve been thinking of converting some of your retirement assets to a Roth IRA, rising tax rates are just one more reason to do it sooner rather than waiting till next year.

With a traditional IRA you pay taxes when you withdraw money, but with a Roth you pay those taxes when the money goes in. For those who think taxes will go up, and especially for those who expect to have substantial assets to pass on to the next generation, a Roth is a nice planning tool. That’s why when Roth conversions were opened up to those with modified adjusted gross income greater than $100,000 in 2010, financial planners and private wealth advisers urged many of their clients to make the switch.

Oct 20, 2010
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1099 tax rule may bring big pain to small business

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The new rules on 1099 forms, which were attached to the health care bill and are set to go into effect in 2012, call for all businesses, no matter how small, to file 1099 forms for goods as well as for services. That sounds like a technicality, but it’s got small business up in arms.

Here’s why it matters, and what you need to know.

What exactly is the rule, anyway?

The new rule requires all business to file 1099 forms for goods as well as services, if those goods cost over $600 annually (the current threshold). It also gets rid of the distinction between corporations, which previously did not need to receive 1099s, and unincorporated entities, which did. The rule is slated to go into effect in 2012.

Oct 18, 2010
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Tax rule change causes big small-business ruckus

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In the big tax fights of this year, the coming changes to who must get 1099 forms would hardly seem to rate. But for the vast majority of small businesses, these new rules will hit far harder than the estate tax, despite political posturing on that front.

The new rules on 1099 forms, which were attached to the health care bill and are set to go into effect in 2012, call for all businesses, no matter how small, to file 1099 forms for goods as well as services, if those goods cost over $600 (the current threshold). It also gets rid of the distinction between corporations, which previously did not need to receive 1099s, and unincorporated entities, which did.

Oct 4, 2010
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Estate tax uncertainty: Planning for 2011

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When you think about what the outcome of the highly political battle over the estate tax might be, just remember: Last year’s common wisdom that lawmakers would not allow the estate tax to expire for one year proved wrong. Even after the deaths of billionaires including George Steinbrenner; Janet Morse Cargill of the family that founded Cargill; Texas pipeline magnate Dan Duncan; and California real estate mogul Walter Shorenstein, the gap year has continued without any clarity.

Talk to estate attorneys and advisors and they laugh at their own predictions for the estate tax, whether past or future. With so many competing proposals, and heated rhetoric on both sides, it’s hard to see what will happen in the 13 weeks remaining till yearend. “It’s been an experience not unlike the market experience, where fear has taken hold and analytics have taken a backseat,” says Frank Dubreuil, national managing director at Bernstein Global Wealth Management in San Francisco.

Sep 17, 2010
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3 ways to play higher taxes

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Nothing is certain except death and taxes, so the saying goes. But today, with tax rates in flux after yearend, and daily pronouncements from lawmakers — now back from summer recess — about what should happen, uncertainty reigns.

Will the Obama Administration win its battle to extend the Bush-era tax cuts for the middle class (read: couples who make $250,000 or less, and singles who earn $200,000 or less), while allowing them to expire for the wealthy?
Will the Republicans win in their efforts to have all of those tax cuts extended for everyone, including the well-heeled?
Will gridlock mean that the tax cuts simply expire?

    • About Amy

      "Amy Feldman is an award-winning journalist and writer, specializing in business and finance. She writes a twice-monthly column on taxes for Reuters. The opinions expressed are her own."
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