Amy's Feed
May 26, 2015
via Reuters FYI

Feminism, North Korean style

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An employee enters a room at a hotel in Mount Kumgang resort September 1, 2011. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

North Korea: a model of gender equality?

Well, not exactly. But while most North Korean state jobs go to men, it’s the women who make most of the money in the country’s unofficial economy. In fact, while women account for just half of the workforce, they make about 70 percent of the household income, according to new research.

May 26, 2015
via Reuters FYI

Feminism, North Korean style

Photo

An employee enters a room at a hotel in Mount Kumgang resort September 1, 2011. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

North Korea: a model of gender equality?

Well, not exactly. But while most North Korean state jobs go to men, it’s the women who make most of the money in the country’s unofficial economy. In fact, while women account for just half of the workforce, they make about 70 percent of the household income, according to new research.

May 22, 2015
via Reuters FYI

Mmmm, tasty bug poison

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Separated saffron stigmas are kept in a plate beside the flowers during a drying process in Pampore, 9 miles south of Srinagar November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

Saffron: Delicious for humans, not so great for mosquitoes.

New research shows that the (expensive!) spice has properties that erode the digestive system of a dengue-spreading mosquito. Brazilian scientists say by mixing saffron with sugar water they can effectively poison mosquitoes, potentially limiting the reproduction of the illness-carrying pests.

May 22, 2015
via Reuters FYI

Mmmm, tasty bug poison

Photo

 

Separated saffron stigmas are kept in a plate beside the flowers during a drying process in Pampore, 9 miles south of Srinagar November 2, 2012. REUTERS/Fayaz Kabli

Saffron: Delicious for humans, not so great for mosquitoes.

New research shows that the (expensive!) spice has properties that erode the digestive system of a dengue-spreading mosquito. Brazilian scientists say by mixing saffron with sugar water they can effectively poison mosquitoes, potentially limiting the reproduction of the illness-carrying pests.

May 21, 2015
via Reuters FYI

Acrobatic arachnid

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A cart wheeling spider. REUTERS/ Prof. Dr. Ingo Rechenberg, Technical University Berlin/Handout via Reuters

Meet the cartwheeling spider. He’s one of about 18,000 new species — some extinct, some living — that scientists have discovered in the past year. The spider crawled (or cartwheeled, as it were) to a rarefied group of the “top 10″ most exceptional animal discoveries during 2014 — others include the chicken from hell, fanged frog and this weird sea slug. You can watch the cartwheeling spider in action, over here.

May 21, 2015
via Reuters FYI

Acrobatic arachnid

Photo

 

A cart wheeling spider. REUTERS/ Prof. Dr. Ingo Rechenberg, Technical University Berlin/Handout via Reuters

Meet the cartwheeling spider. He’s one of about 18,000 new species — some extinct, some living — that scientists have discovered in the past year. The spider crawled (or cartwheeled, as it were) to a rarefied group of the “top 10″ most exceptional animal discoveries during 2014 — others include the chicken from hell, fanged frog and this weird sea slug. You can watch the cartwheeling spider in action, over here.

May 20, 2015
via Reuters FYI

Chilean volcano awakens

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The Villarrica Volcano is seen partially covered by clouds at Pucon, Chile, May 18, 2015. REUTERS/Cristobal Saavedra

A sleeping beast has awakened.

After several weeks of rumbling, the once-sleeping Villarrica Volcano in Chile is showing more signs of life. Click here to see some thrilling Reuters photography of the not-so-dormant peak.

May 20, 2015
via Reuters FYI

Chilean volcano awakens

Photo

 

The Villarrica Volcano is seen partially covered by clouds at Pucon, Chile, May 18, 2015. REUTERS/Cristobal Saavedra

A sleeping beast has awakened.

After several weeks of rumbling, the once-sleeping Villarrica Volcano in Chile is showing more signs of life. Click here to see some thrilling Reuters photography of the not-so-dormant peak.

May 19, 2015
via The Great Debate

That’s billion, with a bee: Measuring the massive cost of hive collapse

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In farming, technology will only take you so far. GPS can help drive automated harvesters around the fields, satellites help to ensure the right crops get planted at the right time. But if you want your crops to grow, you’ll have to rely on something a little more old-fashioned: honey bees.

And they’re dying in enormous numbers:

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The makers of insecticides containing neonics, Bayer and Syngenta chief among them, have a lot to lose if regulatory bodies end up siding with the environmentalists. More than 90 percent of the corn in the U.S. is treated with neonics, according to this release from Bayer. To put this in perspective, last year the USDA estimated that around 91.6 million acres of corn were planted in the United States. That’s a lot of neonic’d corn.

May 19, 2015
via Reuters FYI

Endless summer

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A boat paddle is shown on the bottom of the nearly dry Almaden Reservoir near San Jose, California January 21, 2014. REUTERS/Robert Galbraith

Is it hot in here or is it just… a profound shift in climate and weather on a global scale?