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Oct 28, 2011

Cradle of Tunisia revolt rocked by new protests

SIDI BOUZID, Tunisia (Reuters) – Smoke billowed from a wrecked police station in Tunisia’s Sidi Bouzid Friday after protesters angry that their election candidates were disqualified rampaged through the town that was the cradle of the “Arab Spring” revolt.

The only sign of any security presence were a few soldiers at the top of the street leading into the town center, but they were making no effort to restore order, leaving several hundred protesters in control.

Oct 28, 2011
via FaithWorld

Tunisia’s moderate Islamists win vote, leader says rights are assured

Photo

(Rachid Ghannouchi (R), leader of the Islamist Ennahda movement, smiles as he meets his supporters after the announcement of the country's election results, outside his headquarters in Tunis October 27, 2011/Zohra Bensemra)

The moderate¬† Islamist Ennahda party was officially declared winner of Tunisia’s election, setting it up to form an Islamist-led government. Ennahda has tried to reassure secularists nervous about the prospect of Islamist rule in one of the Arab world’s most liberal countries by saying it will respect women’s rights and not try to impose a Muslim moral code on society.

Oct 28, 2011

Tunisian Islamist election win marred by clashes

TUNIS, Oct 28 (Reuters) – The Islamist Ennahda party was
officially declared the winner of Tunisia’s election, setting it
up to form the first Islamist-led government in the wake of the
“Arab Spring” uprisings.

But the election, which has so far confounded predictions it
would tip the North African country into crisis, turned violent
on Thursday when protesters angry their fourth-placed party was
eliminated from the poll set fire to the mayor’s office in a
provincial town.

Oct 28, 2011

Violence erupts after Tunisian Islamists win vote

TUNIS (Reuters) – Tunisian electoral officials confirmed the Islamist Ennahda party as winner of the North African country’s election, setting it up to form the first Islamist-led government in the wake of the Arab Spring uprisings.

But the election, which has so far confounded predictions it would tip the country into crisis, turned violent when protesters angry their fourth-placed party was eliminated from the poll set fire to the mayor’s office in a provincial town.

Oct 27, 2011

Tunisian Islamists confirmed election winners

TUNIS (Reuters) – Tunisian election officials on Thursday confirmed the Islamist Ennahda party as winner of the North African country’s election, setting it up to form the first Islamist-led government in the wake of the Arab Spring uprisings.

Ennahda has tried to reassure secularists and investors, nervous about the prospect of Islamist rule in one of the Arab world’s most liberal countries, by saying it would not stop tourists wearing bikinis on beaches or impose Islamic banking.

Oct 27, 2011

Tunisian Islamists await word on election win

TUNIS (Reuters) – Tunisian Islamists awaited confirmation on Thursday that their Ennahda party had won a historic victory in the North African country’s first free elections after an uprising ousted former ruler Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali.

Ennahda has tried to reassure secularists and investors, nervous about the prospect of Islamist rule in one of the Arab world’s most liberal countries, by saying it would not stop tourists wearing bikinis on beaches or impose Islamic banking.

Oct 27, 2011

Tunisia’s Ennahda likely to back an open economy

TUNIS (Reuters) – Tunisian Islamists who won a historic election victory this week are expected to promote business-friendly economic policies but Europe’s economic woes could favour Gulf investors in the short term, analysts say.

Ennahda has tried hard to assuage the concerns of Western powers and secular elites which have long had the upper hand in the North African country that it will not alter laws that guarantee women equal rights to men in divorce, marriage and inheritance.

Oct 26, 2011

Analysis: Tunisia’s Ennahda likely to back an open economy

TUNIS (Reuters) – Tunisian Islamists who won a historic election victory this week are expected to promote business-friendly economic policies but Europe’s economic woes could favor Gulf investors in the short term, analysts say.

Ennahda has tried hard to assuage the concerns of Western powers and secular elites which have long had the upper hand in the North African country that it will not alter laws that guarantee women equal rights to men in divorce, marriage and inheritance.

Oct 25, 2011
via FaithWorld

Tunisia’s Ghannouchi is too liberal for some conservative Islamists

Photo

(Rached Ghannouchi, head of the moderate Islamist Ennahda party, speaks at a news conference in Tunis October 19, 2011/Zoubeir Souissi)

Tunisian Islamist leader Rachid Ghannouchi is seen by many secularists as a dangerous radical, but for some conservative clerics who see themselves as the benchmark of orthodox Islam — he is so liberal that they call him an unbeliever. His Ennahda party won Tunisia’s first free elections, 10 months after an uprising brought down ruler Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali, who had banned the group and imprisoned Ghannouchi before he took up home as an exile in London.

Oct 25, 2011

Tunisia’s Ghannouchi too liberal for some Islamists

TUNIS (Reuters) – Tunisian Islamist leader Rachid Ghannouchi is seen by many secularists as a dangerous radical, but for some conservative clerics who see themselves as the benchmark of orthodox Islam — he is so liberal that they call him an unbeliever.

Ghannouchi’s Ennahda party won Tunisia’s first free elections, 10 months after an uprising brought down ruler Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali, who had banned the group and imprisoned Ghannouchi before he took up home as an exile in London.

    • About Andrew

      "I write on Iranian and Gulf Arab politics, based in Dubai. I was previously based in Riyadh, in charge of Reuters Saudi small but growing editorial operation, and before that was based in Egypt. I have also reported for Reuters from Iraq, Sudan, Afghanistan, Israel and the Occupied Territories. I am the author of two books, "Popular Culture in the Arab World" and "What the Arabs Think of America", and read Arabic, Farsi and French."
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