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Jul 6, 2011
via FaithWorld

“Neither God, nor Master” film angers Tunisian Islamists

Photo

(A Tunisian flag at a peaceful demonstration in Tunis January 15, 2011/Zohra Bensemra)

Six months after Tunisia’s uprising, religious tension is rising over the limits of freedom of expression, as Islamists challenge the dominance of liberals in what was once a citadel of Arab secularism. Last week several dozen men attacked a cinema in Tunis that had advertised a film publicly titled in French ‘Ni Dieu, Ni Maitre’ (No God, No Master) by Tunisian-French director Nadia El-Fani, an outspoken critic of political Islam.

Jul 6, 2011

“No God” film angers Tunisian Islamists

TUNIS, July 6 (Reuters) – Six months after Tunisia’s
uprising, religious tension is rising over the limits of freedom
of expression, as Islamists challenge the dominance of liberals
in what was once a citadel of Arab secularism.

Last week several dozen men attacked a cinema in Tunis that
had advertised a film publicly titled in French ‘Ni Dieu, Ni
Maitre’ (No God, No Master) by Tunisian-French director Nadia
El-Fani, an outspoken critic of political Islam.

Jul 1, 2011

Tunisians take pride in “Arab spring” slogans, humor

TUNIS (Reuters) – At 7.45 am on any given day in the Tunisian capital, you might notice that drivers stuck in rush-hour traffic seem to be chortling away in unison.

On Radio Mosaic, the North African country’s most popular radio station, it’s daily sketch time when comedian Migalo ribs not just ousted Tunisian leader Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali, but all of the Arab leaders fighting for survival in the ‘Arab Spring’.

Jun 30, 2011

Libya risks extremism if war drags on: World Bank

TUNIS (Reuters) – A protracted struggle for Libya could leave it in the hands of extremists instead of the liberal economic technocrats who now lead its rebel movement, the World Bank’s representative for Libya said on Thursday.

“If this civil war goes on, it would be a new Somalia, which I don’t say lightly,” said Marouane Abassi, World Bank country manager for Libya who has been in Tunisia since February.

Jun 9, 2011
via FaithWorld

Sunni-Shi’ite sectarian divide widens after Bahrain unrest

Photo

(A new sign showing the direction towards Al Farooq Junction, previously known as Pearl Square, stands along a road in Manama May 31, 2011. Bahraini authorities demolished the monument in Pearl Square in March following the country's unrest where thousands of Shiite Muslims protested by camping there/Hamad I Mohammed)

Sectarian tension between Sunni and Shi’ite Muslims has reached new heights in Bahrain after pro-democracy protests that the Sunni minority government crushed with martial law and foreign military forces. Inspired by the uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia, Sunni and Shi’ite Bahrainis took to the streets in early February to demand political reforms in a country where the ruling Al Khalifa family appoints cabinet ministers and an upper house of parliament, neutering the powers of the elected assembly.

Jun 9, 2011

Sectarian divide widens after Bahrain unrest

MANAMA (Reuters) – Sectarian tension between Sunni and Shi’ite Muslims has reached new heights in Bahrain after pro-democracy protests that the Sunni minority government crushed with martial law and foreign military forces.

Inspired by the uprisings in Egypt and Tunisia, Sunni and Shi’ite Bahrainis took to the streets in early February to demand political reforms in a country where the ruling Al Khalifa family appoints cabinet ministers and an upper house of parliament, neutering the powers of the elected assembly.

Jun 3, 2011

Protests simmer as Bahrain wins back Formula One

MANAMA, June 3 (Reuters) – Bahrain scored a much anticipated
public relations coup on Friday by winning back its Formula One
Grand Prix, cancelled earlier this year after protests erupted
in the Gulf Arab island kingdom.

Majority Shi’ites demanding political reforms continued to
stage protests, challenging the lifting of emergency rule two
days ago that minority Sunni rulers called a return to normal
conditions that could help bring back tourism and commerce.

Jun 3, 2011

Bahrain says Grand Prix to return, Shi’ites protest

MANAMA, June 3 (Reuters) – Bahrain celebrated winning back
its Formula Grand Prix on Friday while majority Shi’ites
demanding political reforms continued to stage protests in the
Sunni-run Gulf Arab state.

“Congratulations – we got it!” Fayyad, a Sunni employee of a
private airline, shouted in a cafe in Manama when news began to
buzz in social media that a motor racing council meeting in
Barcelona had agreed to reinstate the race later this year.

Jun 2, 2011

Bahrain targets doctors with post-protest sackings

MANAMA, June 2 (Reuters) – Bahrain has dismissed hundreds of
professionals suspected of taking part in pro-democracy protests
this year, according to activists who say many have been
targeted simply for being Shi’ite.

Bahrain called in Saudi and United Arab Emirates security
forces in March to crush the protests which were dominated by
the Shi’ite Muslim majority in the Gulf Arab state, unleashing a
campaign of arrests in over two months of martial law.

Jun 2, 2011

Bahrain wary of protests before Formula One ruling

MANAMA (Reuters) – Bahrain, eager for Formula One organisers to reinstate a motor race postponed after popular protests erupted in February, acted to prevent any unrest on Thursday after lifting martial law earlier in the week.

Police patrolled the streets of Manama and villages around the capital to snuff out any pro-democracy protests a day before the world motor racing body meets to decide whether Bahrain can stage its prestigious Grand Prix race later in the year.

    • About Andrew

      "I write on Iranian and Gulf Arab politics, based in Dubai. I was previously based in Riyadh, in charge of Reuters Saudi small but growing editorial operation, and before that was based in Egypt. I have also reported for Reuters from Iraq, Sudan, Afghanistan, Israel and the Occupied Territories. I am the author of two books, "Popular Culture in the Arab World" and "What the Arabs Think of America", and read Arabic, Farsi and French."
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