Andy's Feed
Aug 3, 2015

Breakdown: Taxing journey to India’s single market

(The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions
expressed are his own.)

By Andy Mukherjee

SINGAPORE, Aug 3 (Reuters Breakingviews) – India’s boldest
tax overhaul in 60 years will fall short of its early promise.
Over time, however, the proposed goods and services levy could
prove a huge positive for companies and consumers. It would also
show Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s reform drive is intact.

Jul 30, 2015
via Breakingviews

Malaysian crisis could do lasting financial damage

Photo

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

By unceremoniously dumping his deputy, embattled Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak has opened the door to a protracted power struggle. In doing so, he raises the prospect of lasting financial damage.

Jul 23, 2015
via Breakingviews

South Korea might need stronger medicine than QE

Photo

By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

South Korea’s slowest economic growth in years reflects a deep malaise. Forget another rate cut, or just money-printing. The economy needs something stronger than even quantitative easing to combat an excess of household debt and the emerging risk of deflation.

Jul 22, 2015

India in depth: Steel yourself for China risk

(The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions
expressed are his own.)

By Andy Mukherjee

SINGAPORE, July 22 (Reuters Breakingviews) – An abrupt
slowdown in Chinese demand could send deflationary ripples
around the world. The threat to commodity producers like
Australia and Indonesia is obvious. But India, too, must beware.
If surplus Chinese output starts flooding onto world markets,
India’s struggling steelmakers might turn into zombies.

Jul 21, 2015
via Breakingviews

China fatigued by debt as flexible yuan turns 10

Photo

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions here are his own.

China left the cloistered safety of its dollar peg exactly ten years ago, on July 21, 2005. It was a major step on the journey toward global economic preeminence, and a clear endorsement of market forces. That was then.

At the most obvious level, the change has been a big success. The 53 percent increase in the yuan’s real effective exchange rate against trading partners’ currencies since July 2005 has given imports a real boost. Outsized Chinese current account surpluses, the much-maligned symbol of China enriching itself by pushing the West into debt, have become a thing of the past.

Jul 21, 2015
via Breakingviews

China fatigued by debt as flexible yuan turns 10

Photo

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions here are his own.

China left the cloistered safety of its dollar peg exactly ten years ago, on July 21, 2005. It was a major step on the journey toward global economic preeminence, and a clear endorsement of market forces. That was then.

At the most obvious level, the change has been a big success. The 53 percent increase in the yuan’s real effective exchange rate against trading partners’ currencies since July 2005 has given imports a real boost. Outsized Chinese current account surpluses, the much-maligned symbol of China enriching itself by pushing the West into debt, have become a thing of the past.

Jul 15, 2015
via Breakingviews

China GDP surprise leaves central bank on the hook

Photo

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

China’s central bank is still on the hook, even after surprisingly strong second-quarter growth.

Jul 15, 2015
via Breakingviews

China GDP surprise leaves central bank on the hook

Photo

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

China’s central bank is still on the hook, even after surprisingly strong second-quarter growth.

Jul 8, 2015

Asia needs to print cash to mop up oil slick

(The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions
expressed are his own.)

By Andy Mukherjee

SINGAPORE, July 8(Reuters Breakingviews) – Asia might need
to print new cash to mop up the oil spill. Deflation risks in
the region are rising with falling crude prices. Stuffing
freshly minted money into the bank accounts of indebted
households could be more effective than coaxing banks to finance
new investment.

Jul 3, 2015
via Breakingviews

Life after default: Malaysia’s tips for Greece

Photo

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

As he prepares for a referendum that could determine Greece’s future in the euro zone, Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras could seek some inspiration from Mahathir Mohamad, Malaysia’s leader during the 1998 financial crisis. Breakingviews imagines a conversation between the two.

    • About Andy

      "Andy Mukherjee covers Asian economies from Singapore. He joined from The Straits Times where he was a senior writer. Andy spent eight years at Bloomberg News, the last five as an Asia columnist. In 2004, and again in 2006, he was awarded the second prize for outstanding commentary writing by the New York-based South Asian Journalists' Association. He left Bloomberg to join a start-up business television station in Mumbai where he was the executive editor until 2010. Andy has an undergraduate degree in journalism from University of Delhi."
    • Follow Andy