Anthony De Rosa

Separating truth from fiction about Facebook

By Anthony De Rosa
March 5, 2013

There’s a lot of inaccurate information out there about the way Facebook is promoting posts from people who pay for it. Some of this misinformation comes from writers using their experiences as an example of how things happen to everyone on Facebook, not realizing they’re different than many other people on the service or other people who use the “follow” option (formerly known as “subscribe.”) There’s also an unfortunate tendency to not check facts with Facebook. 

Most people don’t care about their digital privacy

By Anthony De Rosa
December 17, 2012

Most of us simply don’t care about our digital privacy. Sure, you see people citing their displeasure every time Facebook changes their terms of service, but with more than a billion users, few actually leave. Today, Instagram took a chance on its own privacy policy, betting that people will treat its service the same way. Instagram now will feature advertising on its mobile application that uses your name, likeness and content, tracks your location and shares the data with Facebook.

You don’t own your hashtag

By Anthony De Rosa
November 28, 2012

Today the Obama administration unveiled a hashtag “#My2k” to push their “fiscal cliff” message that if middle-class tax cuts aren’t extended, middle-income families will lose $2,000 of income a year. Soon after, conservative think tank The Heritage Foundation purchased the following sponsored tweet that appears at the very top of any search for #My2K:

Where social media fails

By Anthony De Rosa
October 19, 2012

I’ve been thinking a lot about my use of social media and how helpful it is in informing the people who consume it. This election season has particularly made me think more critically about how sometimes the short, context-less text updates can lead to a poorly informed public. I’m certainly not the first person to realize this, as Craig Kanalley recently wrote in detail. People increasingly latch on to the latest minutiae of the campaign, the Big Bird, the binders, the memes, which have little relevance to the actual issues that matter: employment, foreign policy, the expanding income gap, so on and so forth. Here’s what we plan to do to improve the signal to noise ratio.

Rupert Murdoch’s best tweets of all time

By Anthony De Rosa
June 28, 2012


[View the story "Best @RupertMurdoch tweets of all time" on Storify]
Best @RupertMurdoch tweets of all time

Storified by Anthony De Rosa · Mon, May 14 2012 12:38:49

Why is @Reuters yelling at me?

By Anthony De Rosa
June 22, 2012

We conducted a survey of our @Reuters followers recently, and asked them this:  sometimes the Reuters wire publishes alerts in ALL CAPS, usually when the news is urgent.  Should we run them in uppercase and lower case on Twitter, as we would for normal conversation? What is more important?

Syria al-Shaab manages to broadcast under fire

By Anthony De Rosa
June 11, 2012

Using a combination of in-studio anchors and citizens piped in from Skype reporting directly from the ground, Syria al-Shaab manages to broadcast 12 hours of live programming a day from a country that won’t allow foreign reporters in.

Amid top team departures, foursquare pushes past the “check in”

By Anthony De Rosa
June 7, 2012

Social location app foursquare has released a completely redesigned version that attempts to shift from making “checking in” the focus to discovering places to go, things to do and events to see.

Aereo and Skitter attempt to disrupt traditional televison

By Anthony De Rosa
June 7, 2012

Two startups are trying to disrupt the traditional television model. One of them, Aereo, has been taken to court by the incumbent networks. The other, Skitter has made deals with the content providers they’re rebroadcasting. Here’s a look at both in the latest Tech Tonic.