Opinion

Anthony De Rosa

Interview with Dan Rather

Anthony De Rosa
Dec 6, 2011 22:33 UTC

I’ll be interviewing Dan Rather of HDnet this evening at 8:30pm ET. Dan’s career spans over 50 years, he’s seen ten presidents come and go, reported on more than twenty conflicts and wars while on the ground from most of them. He was the longest tenured broadcast anchor and managing editor in television history, serving 34 years at CBS Evening News. Today he’s breaking new ground at HDnet, and syndicating to next generation convergence platforms like Blip.tv

To watch a live stream of my interview click here.

Is Social TV the future of television?

Anthony De Rosa
Nov 18, 2011 09:00 UTC

I spoke to Christy Tanner, EVP and GM of TVGuide.com to talk about the rise of Social TV and discuss if it can truly transform how we watch television.

News agencies must evolve or meet extinction

Anthony De Rosa
Nov 16, 2011 21:47 UTC

Imagine you’re a reporter and you suddenly witness a major news event occurring right before your eyes. Do you snap it to the wire, file a story to your website, or tweet it out to your followers? If you’re at the AP, you damn well better not choose the latter.

In a perfect world, you’d want to do all the above, though your employer is going to likely want you to do the first two before you tweet. Today, Reuters is a lot more than just a wire service. We’ve built — and are continuing to build — what we think is the world’s greatest news website, in the form of Reuters.com, and part of that is providing our readers with reliable and timely news, information, opinion and analysis.

An extension of that website is the information we post on our social media accounts, at Google+, Twitter and on Facebook. We’re not just reporting our own news there, but have become a beacon for all news, being as comprehensive as possible so readers come to us first for all they need to know. We’ve got things like Counterparties, created by Ryan McCarthy and Felix Salmon that does a great job at bringing news from around the web to our readers.

The highly anticipated release of Call of Duty

Anthony De Rosa
Nov 12, 2011 22:26 UTC

I spoke to tech correspondent Liana Baker about Call of Duty : Modern Warfare 3, the biggest video game release ever.

So you think you have a great idea for an app?

Anthony De Rosa
Oct 26, 2011 19:59 UTC

What goes into making a great application? In a three part series I sit down with Richard Ting, SVP of Social and Mobile Platforms at R/GA to find out.

A look at the operational groups at Occupy Wall Street

Anthony De Rosa
Oct 22, 2011 00:26 UTC

I took a tour of the operational groups at Occupy Wall Street at the start of the third week of the occupation.

How do objects talk to us?

Anthony De Rosa
Oct 5, 2011 02:17 UTC

I stopped by the MoMA exhibit, ”Talk to Me” – and explored how objects communicate with people.

Is technology killing jobs?

Anthony De Rosa
Sep 26, 2011 19:33 UTC

I talked to Jeff Jarvis who discusses how technology has created a lower demand for many type of jobs that are likely never to return. He proposes how we might deal with the consequences.

Don’t dismiss the Wall Street occupation

Anthony De Rosa
Sep 26, 2011 15:11 UTC

It would seem that a populist uprising against corporate greed would find a widely approving audience, yet the current occupation of Wall Street has mostly been received with a mix of muted support and mockery. The now week old protest, which has been reported to have attracted several hundred activists this past weekend, is struggling to be understood.

There is no leader, by design, and the demands are still being formed by General Assemblies, a loose group of protesters who gather to discuss their grievances with what they see as a system that takes from the middle class and poor and protects the rich. They represent what they call “the 99%,” the population outside of top 1% of income earners.

Protesters complained early on that they were not receiving attention from mainstream media, so they took to social media, using the hashtag #occupywallst (and apparently spreading to #occupyboston #occupyLA #occupydenver #occupytexas #occupynola #occupychi #occupyphoenix as well,) sharing minute by minute accounts on Twitter, posting photos and video, and live streaming nearly the entire time.

David Karp discusses Tumblr’s growing pains

Anthony De Rosa
Sep 8, 2011 16:09 UTC

The very platform this post is appearing on is undergoing a bit of a revolution. The rise of blogs over the past decade has begun to give way to microblogging platforms, such as Twitter and Tumblr. The difference between the two is that microblogs tend to rely heavily on short bursts of information: links, photos, videos and brief messages. Blogger fatigue gave way to sharing smaller, less labor intensive bits of content.

The short timely updates have not gone unnoticed. Twitter has become something of a wire that provides up to the second reports about breaking news from around the world, used by both large traditional news outlets and freelance reporters. Tumblr is used by ABC journalist Matthew Keys for, among other topics, coverage of the Japan earthquake, which was recognized with a nomination by the Online News Association for the best breaking news by a small site. Until recently, Keys was a freelancer, but his online reporting on microblogging platforms drew attention and led to his recent hire by ABC.

While Twitter’s membership rate grew 26% over the past year, according to Search Engine Journal, Tumblr’s rate has been equally, if not more impressive. According to ComScore, Tumblr attracted 13.4 million visitors in July 2011, up 218% from a year ago (4.2 million in July 2010) along with a staggering 2.5 billion page views per month. 12.5 billion page views per month (according to Quantcast) With tremendous growth comes growing pains, as Twitter once experienced with their own pre-2008 downtime issues.

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