Opinion

Anthony De Rosa

Overheard in the Alley Part 2: The real problem with job creation – Tech Tonic

Anthony De Rosa
Feb 25, 2012 05:09 UTC

I sat down with Venture for America founder and CEO, Andrew Yang, to talk about the real issues in job creation and how his new venture will help the start-up industry take the lead on job creation.

Is technology killing jobs?

Anthony De Rosa
Sep 26, 2011 19:33 UTC

I talked to Jeff Jarvis who discusses how technology has created a lower demand for many type of jobs that are likely never to return. He proposes how we might deal with the consequences.

A teachable moment

Anthony De Rosa
Mar 7, 2011 17:39 UTC

Is a crisis in education less important than a crisis of our capital markets? At the end of 2008, the federal government took aggressive measures to ensure that a supposed complete financial meltdown would be averted by purchasing troubled assets and restoring liquidity to the largest banks in America. Only a few months following the bailout of these banks, many of them paid out healthy bonuses to the same executives responsible for causing the situation to unfold.

Today, in Wisconsin, we watch teachers fight to ensure they receive a five figure salary. According to The Atlantic, the average salary for teachers in Wisconsin is slightly worse than the national average with starting salaries of $32,642 and a maximum with a master’s degree of $60,036. Meanwhile, the average Wall St. bonus, not salary, fell to a measly $128, 530. Goldman Sachs paid $431,000 on average.

Is it fair to compare the salaries of Wall Street executives to the teachers in Wisconsin? Are the jobs on Wall Street more valuable than the ones in education? It seems like an easy answer, with Wall Street profits reaching $27.6 billion last year. But with our job market thinning and unemployment hovering around 9% it seems wise to invest in education to help build the jobs of tomorrow. The financial sector is but one component of our economy, an economy sorely needing diversification based on how apparent it is now that we depended on Wall Street to create capital and jobs for far too long.

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