Opinion

Anthony De Rosa

Syria al-Shaab manages to broadcast under fire

Anthony De Rosa
Jun 11, 2012 23:25 UTC

Using a combination of in-studio anchors and citizens piped in from Skype reporting directly from the ground, Syria al-Shaab manages to broadcast 12 hours of live programming a day from a country that won’t allow foreign reporters in.

“They hacked into our Skype account about a week ago and sent a virus to all the contacts in it. Every time they do something like that, we know we are doing our jobs” said Summer Ajlouni, founder of Syria al-Shaab in a report by Dan Rather of HDNet.

The channel exists underground. The Syrian regime, according to the broadcasters, is watching, they’ve tried to shut down their satellite broadcasts and jam their Skype contacts, but it has only made the tiny outfit want to do more.

Ahman based Syria al-Shaab is bankrolled on the back of donations with a total of 15 people to run the entire network, in front and behind the camera. They rely on citizens for footage, which are taken with their cellphones and computer cameras.

The channel is seen by satellite and broadcasted online and shared across social media, by Twitter, Facebook and YouTube. Anchor Qutaiba Al-Khatib left a job in the UAE to join the fledgling Syria al-Shaab because he believed in what they were doing.

Amid top team departures, foursquare pushes past the “check in”

Anthony De Rosa
Jun 7, 2012 16:07 UTC

Social location app foursquare has released a completely redesigned version that attempts to shift from making “checking in” the focus to discovering places to go, things to do and events to see.

In their third year, the company has faced some losses at the top of their team, including their head of talent acquisition, a top business development colleague, and their co-founder. Founder and CEO Dennis Crowley discusses the shakeup and the departure of co-founder Naveen Selvadurai.

Aereo and Skitter attempt to disrupt traditional televison

Anthony De Rosa
Jun 7, 2012 15:55 UTC

Two startups are trying to disrupt the traditional television model. One of them, Aereo, has been taken to court by the incumbent networks. The other, Skitter has made deals with the content providers they’re rebroadcasting. Here’s a look at both in the latest Tech Tonic.

Facebook buys Instagram for a billion, releases their own inferior photo app

Anthony De Rosa
May 24, 2012 18:09 UTC

Facebook is launching a stand-alone photo sharing mobile application. This comes weeks after the social network bought Instagram for a billion dollars.

Someone please explain to me why this makes sense.

Here’s why I ask. Instagram, after its 2010 launch, quickly became the most popular photo sharing application on mobile devices. After the acquisition, many users feared that Facebook would ruin the Instagram app. Until now, Facebook has left the product alone. That was a wise move.

And now comes along this new mobile app, called “Facebook Camera.” In almost all aspects, it’s an inferior product to Instagram. The interface is clumsy; the filters are not as good; the product feels like something someone developed long before Instagram and was crushed out of existence.

Facebook brings new ad opportunities to brands

Anthony De Rosa
Feb 29, 2012 19:36 UTC

Facebook unveiled a number of new opportunities for advertising on their social network today, the biggest being the ability to post ads to mobile devices, which they had not yet been offering.

Facebook calls the new ad opportunities “Premium for Facebook” and it opens up the following placements:

    Larger ads on the side of the Facebook home page that users see when they first log in Ads that run inside the Facebook Newsfeed Ads on mobile devices Ads that appear when a user logs out of Facebook The ability to run video ads on all these placements

Tim Pool: Occupy Wall Street’s mobile journalist – Tech Tonic

Anthony De Rosa
Feb 25, 2012 05:20 UTC

If you were to stop independent journalist Tim Pool on the street, you may think he’s just a bike messenger, with his skull cap, hoodie and shoulder strap bag. What you may miss is that Pool has transformed himself into a mobile journalist. He broadcast live videos in the midst of the Occupy movement using just an iPhone, a solar powered backpack and even a drone to an audience of thousands.

So you think you have a great idea for an app?

Anthony De Rosa
Oct 26, 2011 19:59 UTC

What goes into making a great application? In a three part series I sit down with Richard Ting, SVP of Social and Mobile Platforms at R/GA to find out.

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