Opinion

Anthony De Rosa

Where social media fails

Anthony De Rosa
Oct 19, 2012 18:37 UTC

I’ve been thinking a lot about my use of social media and how helpful it is in informing the people who consume it. This election season has particularly made me think more critically about how sometimes the short, context-less text updates can lead to a poorly informed public. I’m certainly not the first person to realize this, as Craig Kanalley recently wrote in detail. People increasingly latch on to the latest minutiae of the campaign, the Big Bird, the binders, the memes, which have little relevance to the actual issues that matter: employment, foreign policy, the expanding income gap, so on and so forth. Here’s what we plan to do to improve the signal to noise ratio.

    Focus my updates on more short, rapid-fire networks like Twitter on doing fact checks, linking to substantive articles about issues related to how the candidates will govern: economy, taxes, social issues, etc. Find flaws in the arguments of both candidates with detailed pieces that point out where they have either been too opaque or flat out lied. Engage with people all over the political spectrum to start a dialogue and understand what they care about. It is “social media” after all and I see many people who are supposed “social media editors” who never engage their readers. Spend more time live blogging, which allows for longer posts and rich media

The Elections 2012 live blog format gives us the room to provide context that you may not be getting from Twitter and Facebook. I’ve put together a number of lists that might also be helpful, which I try to update as much as possible:

Sky News longs for Victorian internet, applies dark age social policy

Anthony De Rosa
Feb 7, 2012 22:51 UTC

In an attempt to shoehorn the social media genie back into the bottle, Sky News has told its reporters they cannot retweet non-Sky sources and must not stray from the topic area or beat that they cover when posting tweets on their Twitter accounts. Not only does this make for a staid and boring feed, but it also puts Sky News reporters at a significant competitive disadvantage to places like Reuters, where we have reporters verifying and tweeting out sources of news from all over the web and from many different news outlets.

Their own boss @RupertMudoch doesn’t even follow these new rules, he frequently references news organizations outside of his own, as @RossNeumann points out. The idea here at Reuters when it comes to social media is to be the beacon for all news, which makes us the go-to source, no matter what the source may be, after being put through our own filters of verification. I’ve written before about how important it is for my own company, Reuters, to be careful if they try to tread in these same waters.

There are occasions where we may share a bit of news or simply cite what other folks on Twitter are saying as a retweet, which in Twitter parlance is an act of quoting someone. It doesn’t imply an endorsement or even an acknowledgement that it is a statement of fact. It is an act of stating, “look here at what this person is saying.”

Matthew Keys joins Reuters as Deputy Social Media Editor

Anthony De Rosa
Jan 9, 2012 14:05 UTC

I am pleased to announce that Matthew Keys will be joining Reuters as our Deputy Social Media Editor. He will produce online content for Reuters.com; expand our presence on TwitterFacebookGoogle+Tumblr and on new platforms; and play a key role in helping to train Reuters journalists on best practices in social media.

Matthew is well known in social media circles as a reliable source for news and was recently nominated for an Online News Association award in the category of “Breaking News excellence” for his coverage of the 2011 Tohoku earthquake, tsunami and Fukushima nuclear disaster in Japan.

Matthew is a recognized leader in helping journalists turn social media into valuable reporting tools. His online tools—a journalists guide for Tumblr, a guide for finding breaking news video on YouTube, as well as a guide for finding breaking news images on Twitter –have helped many journalists taking their first steps into social media.

Is Social TV the future of television?

Anthony De Rosa
Nov 18, 2011 09:00 UTC

I spoke to Christy Tanner, EVP and GM of TVGuide.com to talk about the rise of Social TV and discuss if it can truly transform how we watch television.

News agencies must evolve or meet extinction

Anthony De Rosa
Nov 16, 2011 21:47 UTC

Imagine you’re a reporter and you suddenly witness a major news event occurring right before your eyes. Do you snap it to the wire, file a story to your website, or tweet it out to your followers? If you’re at the AP, you damn well better not choose the latter.

In a perfect world, you’d want to do all the above, though your employer is going to likely want you to do the first two before you tweet. Today, Reuters is a lot more than just a wire service. We’ve built — and are continuing to build — what we think is the world’s greatest news website, in the form of Reuters.com, and part of that is providing our readers with reliable and timely news, information, opinion and analysis.

An extension of that website is the information we post on our social media accounts, at Google+, Twitter and on Facebook. We’re not just reporting our own news there, but have become a beacon for all news, being as comprehensive as possible so readers come to us first for all they need to know. We’ve got things like Counterparties, created by Ryan McCarthy and Felix Salmon that does a great job at bringing news from around the web to our readers.

Social chaos deciphered through social media

Anthony De Rosa
Aug 29, 2011 19:33 UTC

I use a variety of social tools to monitor, verify and report news. In this video I demonstrate a few of the ones I use most often: Tweetdeck, Storyful, Storify and ScribbleLive.

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