Online Producer, New Delhi
Anuja's Feed
Oct 11, 2012

Book Talk: Booker nominee Thayil offers bleak Bombay portrait

NEW DELHI, Oct 11 (Reuters) – Jeet Thayil, one of the
nominees for the 2012 Man Booker Prize for the year’s best novel
in English, paints a stark portrait of Mumbai, or Bombay as he
calls it, in his debut novel “Narcopolis”.

Thayil is a poet and musician who has been writing poetry
since he was 13. His novel takes the reader through the Mumbai
drug world’s smoky alleys and features the musings of opium
addicts in the late 1980s – a situation that Thayil, a former
opium addict himself, knows well.

Jul 5, 2012

Book Talk: Urvashi Gulia debuts with road trip tale

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – A television reporter walks out of the newsroom after a spat with her boss, setting out on an impulsive road trip that eventually puts her life back on track.

Urvashi Gulia’s debut novel “My Way Is the Highway” is in many ways a memoir, with traits for her characters drawn from the author’s real-life observations of India’s ratings-hungry television industry.

Jul 5, 2012

Indian ex-journalist debuts with road trip tale

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – A television reporter walks out of the newsroom after a spat with her boss, setting out on an impulsive road trip that eventually puts her life back on track.

Urvashi Gulia’s debut novel “My Way Is the Highway” is in many ways a memoir, with traits for her characters drawn from the author’s real-life observations of India’s ratings-hungry television industry.

Jul 5, 2012

Book Talk: Indian ex-journalist debuts with road trip tale

NEW DELHI, July 5 (Reuters) – A television reporter walks
out of the newsroom after a spat with her boss, setting out on
an impulsive road trip that eventually puts her life back on
track.

Urvashi Gulia’s debut novel “My Way Is the Highway” is in
many ways a memoir, with traits for her characters drawn from
the author’s real-life observations of India’s ratings-hungry
television industry.

Jun 5, 2012

Archaic law threatens to dampen Mumbai’s spirits

NEW DELHI, June 5 (Reuters) – Want to drink in Mumbai? Do it
at your own risk. Revellers in India’s financial hub caught
drinking alcohol without a licence face stiff fines and a stint
in prison.

City authorities are cracking down on illegal drinking after
busting a rave party in one of Mumbai’s posh neighbourhoods last
month.

May 28, 2012
via India Insight

Do Indians need a licence to drink?

Photo

After police busted a rave in a swanky part of Mumbai last week, the city’s drinkers have woken up with an almighty legal hangover.

Authorities have decided to enforce a 63-year-old law that requires every adult above the age of 25 to own a permit for alcohol consumption.

Apr 19, 2012

Author tracks tales of India’s technicolour youth

NEW DELHI, April 19 (Reuters) – A scriptwriter living with
his girlfriend in Mumbai is put on the spot when the
disapproving parents turn up. A doomed call centre worker lives
in a cloud of numbing drug addiction financed by his high
salary.

These are just a few of the lives chronicled by author
Palash Krishna Mehrotra in his non-fictional account of the
changes that have swept over India over the last three decades,
specifically how the lives of its youth have changed.

Feb 24, 2012
via India Insight

Bollywood stars kick up a fuss with real-life rumpus

Photo

Pow! Biff! Bang! Dishoom! Real life action by Bollywood celebrities has caught the nation’s eyeballs. Shah Rukh Khan was accused of roughing up Shirish Kunder some days ago and made ripples as he brought the media’s gaze from corruption scams and the election circus to the one thing that never fails to draw attention — a spicy brawl.

Now, Saif Ali Khan diverts attention from Vijay Mallya’s king-size woes for beating up a certain businessman in Mumbai’s Taj hotel. Saif was booked for assault, arrested and later bailed — insisting that he was only defending himself.

Oct 25, 2011

Smog dims shine of Diwali

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – Bharat Prakash has stayed indoors on Diwali day for the past four years to avoid the smog that envelopes Indian cities during the festival, which celebrates the triumph of good over evil with fireworks and small oil-filled clay lamps.

As the rest of the country celebrates the Festival of Lights, which falls on Wednesday this year, asthma sufferers like Prakash, 22, will be cooped up at home, dreading the blanket of smoke that worsens the already dire air quality.

Oct 25, 2011

Smog dims shine of India’s festival of lights

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – Bharat Prakash has stayed indoors on Diwali day for the past four years to avoid the smog that envelopes Indian cities during the festival, which celebrates the triumph of good over evil with fireworks and small oil-filled clay lamps.

As the rest of the country celebrates the Festival of Lights, which falls on Wednesday this year, asthma sufferers like Prakash, 22, will be cooped up at home, dreading the blanket of smoke that worsens the already dire air quality.