Anupreeta's Feed
May 18, 2009
via Summit Notebook

Alphabet-shaped recovery? Try bathtub-shaped

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We’ve all heard discussions on what letter of the alphabet the economic recovery will look like. Will it be “V” shaped — as in, a sharp plummeting, followed by an equally sharp upswing? Or more “U” shaped — a downturn followed by a flat period before the recovery starts? Is the lightness we’re witnessing in the economy the mid-point in a more extended recovery process, mirroring the letter “W”? And heaven forbid, let’s not even think we might be stuck in an “L” shaped economy, with no near or medium-term hope of improvement.

We asked the chief executives of Sybase and Symantec, our first two guests at the Reuters Global Technology Summit, what they thought the recovery graph might look like.

May 7, 2009
via MediaFile

Google’s Mayer on how to write online news

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Just about everyone has thrown a thought or two by now into the great bubbling pot of stew that is the future of journalism. Latest in line is Marissa Mayer, Google’s vice president of search products and user experience.Mayer, one of Google’s earliest employees who gets reams of newsprint in Silicon Valley for her cupcake spreadsheets and love of Oscar de la Renta, spoke before a Senate subcommittee on a future of journalism hearing on Wednesday.Apart from defending Google, which has come under attack from the news industry — most notably the Associated Press — for profiting from content, Mayer gave some tips on how journalists should write their stories.Mayer talked about something she called the “atomic unit of consumption” — a news article rather than an entire newspaper, much like one song downloaded digitally instead of buying an entire album. Here’s an excerpt from her prepared testimony:

The atomic unit of consumption for existing media is almost always disrupted by emerging media. For example, digital music caused consumers to think about their purchases as individual songs rather than as full albums. Digital and on-demand video has caused people to view variable-length clips when it is convenient for them, rather than fixed-length programs on a fixed broadcast schedule.Similarly, the structure of the Web has caused the atomic unit of consumption for news to migrate from the full newspaper to the individual article. As with music and video, many people still consume physical newspapers in their original full-length format. But with online news, a reader is much more likely to arrive at a single article. While these individual articles could be accessed from a newspaper’s homepage, readers often click directly to a particular article via a search engine or another Website.

Mayer then went on to suggest that reporters and editors need to think differently about how they write for online:

Treating the article as the atomic unit of consumption online has several powerful consequences. When producing an article for online news, the publisher must assume that a reader may be viewing this article on its own, independent of the rest of the publication.To make an article effective in a standalone setting requires providing sufficient context for first-time readers, while clearly calling out the latest information for those following a story over time. It also requires a different approach to monetization: each individual article should be self-sustaining. These types of changes will require innovation and experimentation in how news is delivered online, and how advertising can support it.

    • About Anupreeta

      "Anupreeta Das is a New York-based reporter covering technology, media and telecoms deals. She has previously written for The Boston Globe, the Christian Science Monitor and many Indian publications. She is the 2009 recipient of a Society of Business Editors and Writers breaking news award for her coverage of Microsoft's failed bid for Yahoo. Das also won a 2006 Foreign Press Association award and an Overseas Press Club scholarship. Das holds graduate degrees in journalism and international political economy from Boston University and the London School of Economics. She speaks fluent Hindi, Assamese and a little Mandarin."
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