Correspondent, New Delhi
Anurag's Feed
Sep 19, 2013
Sep 19, 2013
Sep 18, 2013
Sep 12, 2013

Delhi gang rape trial puts focus on death penalty paradox

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – A judge will announce on Friday whether four men should hang for fatally raping a young woman on a bus last December, in one of the biggest tests in years of India’s paradoxical attitude towards the death penalty.

Indian judges hand down on average 130 death sentences every year, but India has executed just three people in the past 17 years. Despite its apparent reluctance to carry out the sentences, last year India voted against a U.N. draft resolution calling for a global moratorium on executions.

Sep 12, 2013

Rape trial puts focus on India’s death penalty paradox

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – An Indian judge will announce on Friday whether four men should hang for fatally raping a young woman on a bus last December, in one of the biggest tests in years of India’s paradoxical attitude towards the death penalty.

Indian judges hand down on average 130 death sentences every year, but India has executed just three people in the past 17 years. Despite its apparent reluctance to carry out the sentences, last year India voted against a U.N. draft resolution calling for a global moratorium on executions.

Sep 10, 2013

Four face death for ‘cold-blooded’ murder of Delhi gang rape victim

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – Four men were convicted on Tuesday of the “cold-blooded” murder of a woman who was raped and tortured on a bus in New Delhi, a crime that shook India and forced the country to confront sexual violence in a society undergoing wrenching change.

The four – a bus cleaner, gym instructor, fruit seller and an unemployed man – face hanging, the maximum penalty for murder. The trial judge will hear prosecution and defense arguments on sentencing on Wednesday, when he could deliver his ruling.

Sep 9, 2013
via India Insight

Delhi rape victim’s parents hold firm in desire for death penalty

Photo

The family of the trainee physiotherapist who was gang-raped in Delhi last December received a new house and 3.5 million rupees (about $54,000) in compensation for their daughter’s torture and death. It’s a bounty they would rather forgo. They want their daughter’s killers dead.

“Earlier, we used to be happy with whatever little we earned,” the victim’s mother told Reuters in an interview on Sunday. “The difference now is that despite having everything, our eyes are wet all the time.”

Sep 1, 2013

Rupee slump a hard lesson for students overseas

NEW DELHI (Reuters) – Student Mikael Haris is wrestling with the sort of question confronting others across India, including companies, investors and banks, following the 18 percent slump in the rupee this year.

With plans to study for a masters degree in marketing in London from this month, he is trying to decide whether to pay his course fees up front and secure a discount, or to spread them out in the hope that a rebound in the rupee will ultimately reduce his costs.

Sep 1, 2013

Rupee slump a hard lesson for Indian students overseas

NEW DELHI, Sept 1 (Reuters) – Student Mikael Haris is
wrestling with the sort of question confronting others across
India, including companies, investors and banks, following the
18 percent slump in the rupee this year.

With plans to study for a masters degree in marketing in
London from this month, he is trying to decide whether to pay
his course fees up front and secure a discount, or to spread
them out in the hope that a rebound in the rupee will ultimately
reduce his costs.

Aug 28, 2013
via India Insight

India’s parliament gets its groove back, at least for now

Photo

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

India’s notoriously disruptive parliament has been going through a productive phase in the past two days. Bills are getting passed, politicians are discussing the state of the economy and for a change, members are listening to each other as they deliver well-researched speeches.

For a house with one of the poorest records of accomplishments in Indian history, the last two days were downright atypical.

    • About Anurag

      "Anurag covers money, politics and general news based in New Delhi. He joined Reuters in 2008 in Bangalore and covered U.S.-based companies for a little over two years. In the Indian capital, he covered the dynamic Indian aviation industry before moving to his current role. Born and brought up in the beautiful town of Jorhat in Assam, Anurag loves cricket, Bollywood and is a social media addict. When he’s not chasing high-flying CEOs and bureaucrats, Anurag likes to unwind with films and Assamese poetry."
      Joined Reuters:
      2008
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