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from FaithWorld:

Islamic finance seeks to go green with environment-based products

(A partial solar eclipse is seen through a crescent of Faisal Mosque in Islamabad March 29, 2006. The track of the eclipse stretches from eastern Brazil, across the Atlantic to north Africa, then on to the Middle East, Central Asia, west China and Mongolia. REUTERS/Mian Khursheed)

(A partial solar eclipse is seen through a crescent of Faisal Mosque in Islamabad March 29, 2006. REUTERS/Mian Khursheed)

Financial products based on renewable energy and sustainable agriculture are emerging in Islamic finance as asset managers seek a crossover opportunity between ethical and sharia-compliant investing.

Islamic finance follows religious principles which forbid involvement in activities such as gambling, tobacco and alcohol, but the industry has only recently begun to stress themes of wider social responsibility, such as protecting the environment.

Last week, Malaysia announced guidelines for issuance of socially responsible sukuk (Islamic bonds), aimed at helping firms raise money for projects ranging from renewable energy to affordable housing.

from FaithWorld:

Kaleidoscope of flags marks Belfast’s sectarian fault lines

(The national flag of Scotland (C) flies amongst other flags in a street in East Belfast July 5, 2014. Horrified that Scotland might break up the United Kingdom by voting for independence this autumn, thousands of Northern Ireland loyalists are preparing to fight back using their favoured 17th century battle regalia: drums, flutes, banners and orange sashes. Photograph taken on July 5. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton)

(The national flag of Scotland (C) flies amongst other flags in a street in East Belfast July 5, 2014. REUTERS/Cathal McNaughton)

In Northern Ireland, the flags of Israel and the Palestinians are potent symbols of conflict - but here they divide Catholics and Protestants rather than Jews and Muslims.

from FaithWorld:

Diego Maradona steals show from fellow Argentine Pope Francis

(Former soccer star Diego Maradona (L) hugs Pope Francis during a special audience held before a special interreligious "Match for Peace", at the Paul VI hall at the Vatican September 1, 2014. Current and former soccer stars representing various religious faiths will participate in the "Match for Peace", which will be held in the Stadio Olimpico in Rome on Monday night. REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi )

(Former soccer star Diego Maradona (L) hugs Pope Francis during a special audience held before a special interreligious "Match for Peace", at the Paul VI hall at the Vatican September 1, 2014. REUTERS/Alessandro Bianchi )

Pope Francis normally has no competition for attention when he is in a room but it was different on Monday when another larger-than-life Argentine - soccer great Diego Maradona - attended a papal event.

from Alan Baldwin:

Motor racing-Electric series generates plenty of buzz

LONDON, Sept 2 (Reuters) - Alejandro Agag, the man leading the world's first all-electric car racing series, laughingly describes himself as an 'old petrolhead' who likes a bit of noise.

The joke stops there, however. The 43-year-old chief executive has silenced the doubters who only two years ago were questioning whether he could turn his 'Formula E' plans into reality and next week he hopes to show he is on to a winner.

from Reuters FYI:

The tri and error method?

 

Runners and bikers compete in the 34th annual Escape from Alcatraz Triathlon in San Francisco, California June 1, 2014. REUTERS/Noah Berger

Runners and bikers compete in the 34th annual Escape from Alcatraz Triathlon in San Francisco, California June 1, 2014. REUTERS/Noah Berger

Seek medical attention if your race lasts more than four hours

Triathlons draw more middle-aged athletes looking for a new challenge.

 

Big Brother is watching the person who's watching you

Ferguson, Missouri police officers will now wear body cameras, after the shooting of an unarmed black teenager sparked outrage.

from Breakingviews:

Why Citigroup would be better in bits

By Rob Cox

The author is a Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

Nine years ago, Breakingviews proposed an “extreme idea” to Citigroup’s then-leader Charles Prince. The $240 billion New York bank’s market capitalization was lower than the worth of its parts valued separately. By splitting into three separate units, the idea was, Prince could hand shareholders an extra $50 billion or so, the equivalent of one entire U.S. Bancorp at the time.

As it turned out, Citi had bigger concerns ahead. The housing crash exposed spectacular losses, wiping out capital and necessitating a government bailout. Prince was sent dancing onto the golf course. With the crisis now fairly distant in the rear-view mirror, however, it’s time for current Chief Executive Michael Corbat to revisit the case for a breakup.

from Full Focus:

Burning Man

Over 65,000 revelers from all over the world gathered at the sold out festival to spend a week in the remote desert cut off from much of the outside world to experience art, music and the unique community that develops.

from The Great Debate:

Five smart takes explain the Russia-Ukraine conflict from square one

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Ever since the Ukrainian revolution in February this year, the Eastern European country has witnessed spiraling political instability and bloodshed.

Former President Viktor Yanukovich, a Kremlin ally, was driven out by demonstrators in the city’s Independence Square after he refused to sign a political and trade accord with the European Union, which would have brought Ukraine closer to the West.

from The Great Debate:

US strategy vs. Islamic State: Better right than fast

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In her recently published memoir Hard Choices, former Senator Hillary Clinton recounts the meeting, nine days after the election of 2008, when President-elect Barack Obama first asked her to be his secretary of state. He “presented a well-considered argument,” she writes, “explaining that he would have to concentrate most of his time and attention on the economic crisis and needed someone of stature to represent him abroad.”

No doubt he meant that sincerely -- the U.S. financial system was still deep in crisis — but in the context of events this summer, Obama’s assumption that he would be focused mainly on domestic concerns suggests how little even a president of the United States can claim control of world events. The murders of American journalists James Foley and now Steven Sotloff by the Islamic State have put a very fine point on that.

from Breakingviews:

Banks risk provoking EU with bonus get-arounds

By Dominic Elliott

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Investment banks that are too successful in mitigating the impact of Europe’s new bonus curbs could be setting up another fight over pay. Most big banks are now paying so-called allowances to circumvent European Union rules, which bar firms from paying bonuses worth more than double base salary. If policymakers conclude that bankers are still wrongly paid, they could do something about it.

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