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from India Insight:

Interview: Rani Mukerji on playing “Mardaani” roles in Bollywood films

In 1997, when the top-grossing Bollywood films were a mix of fluffy romantic comedies and maudlin love triangles, a barely 20-year-old Rani Mukerji made her Hindi film debut playing a rape victim who is asked to marry her tormentor and faces innumerable challenges in her quest for dignity.

ranimukherjiRemembering that and the other films where she played a strong female character, a newly married Mukerji told India Insight she likes to strike a balance between what she calls substantial roles and those written only for entertaining fans. Her latest film "Mardaani," ("Masculine") produced by her producer husband, sees Mukerji in the role of a tough police officer out to bust a child-trafficking ring.

“I have always tried to portray strong women in all the films that I have done because I do feel that when people see movies they get very moved and they do feel inspired,” she said about the roles that she prefers.

That said, Mukerji does not agree that Bollywood or films in general should take responsibility for what messages people take from films.

from Shashank Chouhan:

Interview: Rani Mukerji on playing “Mardaani” roles in Bollywood films

In 1997, when the top-grossing Bollywood films were a mix of fluffy romantic comedies and maudlin love triangles, a barely 20-year-old Rani Mukerji made her Hindi film debut playing a rape victim who is asked to marry her tormentor and faces innumerable challenges in her quest for dignity.

ranimukherjiRemembering that and the other films where she played a strong female character, a newly married Mukerji told India Insight she likes to strike a balance between what she calls substantial roles and those written only for entertaining fans. Her latest film "Mardaani," ("Masculine") produced by her producer husband, sees Mukerji in the role of a tough police officer out to bust a child-trafficking ring.

from Photographers' Blog:

A moment of stillness

Ferguson, Missouri
By Adrees Latif

A man is doused with milk and sprayed with mist after being hit by an eye irritant from security forces trying to disperse demonstrators protesting against the shooting of unarmed black teen Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri August 20, 2014. REUTERS/Adrees Latif

I was on holiday and far away from Ferguson, Missouri, when 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot dead by a policeman in the town.

The killing of this unarmed black teenager on August 9 sparked huge protests, and by the time I arrived the demonstrations had been going for well over a week.

from Counterparties:

Yellen stays on course

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Janet Yellen gave a much-anticipated Jackson Hole speech on the job market today, and the stock market barely moved. That, says the NYT’s Binyamin Appelbaum, was exactly the the outcome the Fed chair wanted. She said the job market was improvingbut not quite improved enough. The true amount of slack in the labor market is uncertain, and therefore, interest rate policy cannot be prescriptive. The Fed, in other words, is still waiting to see when it will change its wait and see approach on interest rates. (Privately, Jon Hilsenrath and Pedro da Costa report, the Fed is strongly hinting it will raise rates in the summer of 2015.)

One item where Yellen was clear: she is not a fan of Congressional Republicans' calls for the Fed to follow pre-set guidelines, like the Taylor rule, when it sets interest rates. “Monetary policy,” Yellen says, “ultimately must be conducted in a pragmatic manner that relies not on any particular indicator or model, but instead reflects an ongoing assessment of a wide range of information.” The NYT’s Binyamin Appelbaum said that portion of the “speech is a direct rebuttal to GOP/Taylor proposal for Fed  to announce a rule. She’s arguing life is far too complicated.”

from Photographers' Blog:

Brief encounter with a fleeing Yazidi

Fishkhabour, Iraq

By Youssef Boudlal

I remember the scene well. It was the day that I arrived at the Iraqi-Syrian border crossing of Fishkhabour.

With shocked, sunburnt faces, men, women and children in dirt-caked clothes were struggling in temperatures of over 45 degrees Celsius (113 Fahrenheit), waiting patiently for local Kurdish aid.

from India Insight:

Markets this week: Cipla, BHEL top Sensex gainers

A man looks at a screen across the road displaying the election results on the facade of the BSE building in MumbaiThe BSE Sensex closed 1.2 percent higher in a week that was marked by two successive record highs for the benchmark.

Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s Independence Day speech and easing wholesale inflation boosted sentiment earlier in the week. Buying of Indian equities by foreign investors and a slide in Brent crude prices to near 14-months lows also helped.

from James Saft:

Yellen as many-handed policy goddess: James Saft

Aug 22 (Reuters) - Harry Truman once made a plea for a
one-armed economist, being sick and tired of his advisors always
saying "on the one hand this, but on the other hand something
else".

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen in her speech at Jackson
Hole on Friday was like something out of old Harry's nightmares,
offering up so many alternative explanations for the state of
the economy that she seemed like a many-handed Indian goddess of
economists.

from Breakingviews:

Dynegy’s $6.25 bln grab marks return of ambition

By Christopher Swann

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

Dynegy only got out of bankruptcy two years ago. Now two deals worth $6.25 billion, announced on Friday, mark a return of ambition for the U.S. power company. It once tried to buy Enron and eventually went bust after a spat involving activist Carl Icahn. The purchases look sensible, but the lesson from Dynegy’s past is to avoid getting carried away.

from Mark Jones:

Bank of America’s big fine http://t.co/8geyQhSUve

Bank of America’s big fine http://t.co/8geyQhSUve

from Reuters FYI:

Bad baby milk? There’s insurance for that

 

Local industry and commerce administrative bureau personnel check Sanlu formula milk products at a supermarket in Zaozhuang

Local industry and commerce administrative bureau personnel check Sanlu formula milk products at a supermarket in Zaozhuang, Shandong province, September 12, 2008. CREDIT: REUTERS/CHINA DAILY

No lead, melamine or floor meat here

After a series of food safety scares, a Chinese retailer is offering insurance to customers who buy infant milk powder.

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