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from Reuters FYI:

Waiting is the hardest part (for lenders)

Occupy Wall Street demonstrators participating in a street-theater production wear signs around their neck representing their student debt during a protest against the rising national student debt in Union Square, in New York, April 25, 2012. REUTERS/Andrew Burton

Occupy Wall Street demonstrators wear signs around their neck representing their student debt during a protest against the rising national student debt in Union Square, in New York, April 25, 2012. REUTERS/Andrew Burton

Make the lenders wait

Don't be in a hurry to pay off your student loans -- even if you have the cash, experts say.

 

'Are we capable of welcoming these people?'

A Vatican document marks a stark shift in its attitude toward the gay community: tolerance. Radical stuff.

 

A clear and present and inconvenient danger

The U.S. Department of Defense outlines strategies for coping with climate change, claiming that rising temperatures and extreme weather constitute a risk to national security.

from Morning Bid with David Gaffen:

Buyers get out of the way

Time to sit up and pay attention. Monday's end-of-day regurgitation of 100,000 futures contracts in a five-minute span around 3:30 p.m. (1930 GMT) would have been more nerve-wracking had we not already seen the same thing writ small, when about 30,000 contracts were dumped in the waning seconds of last week's trading action.

In each case, the activity was striking and a bit disturbing. See, it's never a great sign when the only thing that ends the selling on a given day is the moment when they turn the machines off (a la Randolph and Mortimer Duke), and Monday wasn't all that much different.

from Breakingviews:

Commodity producer/trader boundary starts to blur

By Swaha Pattanaik

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

Commodity producers and traders were once very different beasts. But the distinctions between the two are increasingly fuzzy.

from Mark Jones:

One view from Dallas: The city isn’t taking Ebola seriously enough http://t.co/S2Kekjb1jG

One view from Dallas: The city isn’t taking Ebola seriously enough http://t.co/S2Kekjb1jG

from The Great Debate:

View from Dallas, Texas: The city isn’t taking Ebola seriously enough

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DALLAS, Texas -- I woke up to an early text from a close neighbor Sunday morning: “Did you get an emergency call from the city?” she asked. Dallas residents in the “M Streets” area were receiving reverse 911 calls about a nurse who lived on the 5700 block of Marquita, a street just four blocks south and four blocks west of the quiet block of McCommas, where I reside with my husband and two young children. The latest international health crisis patient – the first person to contract the disease on American soil – was a neighbor. Ebola was literally at my doorstep.

For me, panic had set in two weeks prior when Thomas Eric Duncan, who has since died of Ebola, was first admitted to Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital, the facility where I gave birth to my son. I wasn’t confident the hospital was equipped to handle an Ebola case. I wasn’t sure we knew enough about the disease. But, importantly, this being my third stint as a Dallas resident, I was unsure the city could handle the responsibility of becoming a guinea pig for the world. After all, Dallas, probably not unlike other U.S. cities, is operating at or close to healthcare capacity dealing with its daily medical demands. The U.S. Ebola protocols were to be tested for the first time in front of the world. Could we react quickly in the midst of an already full plate?  If not, how quickly would our healthcare system -- and our local population -- be in danger?

from MacroScope:

ECB in the dock

Protestors left some barbed wire in front of the euro sign landmark outside the headquarters of the ECB before its monthly news conference in Frankfurt

The European Court of Justice holds a first hearing on the legality of the European Central Bank's Outright Monetary Transactions programme. There won’t be anything definitive today but it serves to rekindle debate about the limits of the ECB’s powers.

In February, the German Constitutional Court asked the European Court to rule on the legality of OMT, the mechanism that drew a line under the euro zone crisis when it was unveiled in 2012. The court may give guidance about how best to make a final ruling which is expected in late spring next year.

from Breakingviews:

Japan’s low unemployment masks overtime slump

By Andy Mukherjee

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

The canary of Japan’s demand slump is singing “overtime”. The country’s low unemployment and high vacancy rates paint a misleading picture of tranquility. A more accurate gauge of the growing nervousness in the economy is the shrinking market for extra working hours.

from Mark Jones:

ECB in the dock http://t.co/KzFfmfqCyX

ECB in the dock http://t.co/KzFfmfqCyX

from Stories I’d like to see:

Following the mistakes in the Texas Ebola story

A worker in a hazardous material suit is sprayed down by a co-worker after coming out of an apartment unit where a man diagnosed with the Ebola virus was staying in Dallas

1. Ebola and malpractice tort reform:

As we all now know, the death of Dallas Ebola patient Thomas Eric Duncan was preceded by what might have been a fatal mistake made by emergency-room doctors or nurses at the Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital. Although he showed up at the hospital complaining of Ebola-like symptoms and reportedly told a nurse that he had just arrived from Liberia, he was sent home with antibiotics.

That mistake has already sparked widespread speculation about a malpractice suit that Duncan’s family could bring against the hospital and its staff.

from Mark Jones:

Following the mistakes in the Texas Ebola story http://t.co/WS9ldJVCDs

Following the mistakes in the Texas Ebola story http://t.co/WS9ldJVCDs

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