from Breakingviews:

Review: To have and have not, Brazil-style

July 1, 2016

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Alison Frankel:

Obscure N.J. law spurs wave of big-money consumer class actions vs. online sellers

July 1, 2016

In 1980, New Jersey enacted a law to prohibit businesses from deceiving consumers about their legal rights. The awkwardly named Truth in Consumer Contract, Warranty and Notice Act provided statutory damages of $100 to "aggrieved consumers" who, for instance, bought a ticket or signed a contract that falsely claimed customers couldn't sue over personal injuries. The point of the law was to protect unsophisticated buyers who might be dissuaded by these deceptive notices from enforcing their legal rights.

from Reuters Select:

Reuters Select: Hong Kong simmers over missing booksellers

July 1, 2016

Reuters photo of the day
Gamines

Competitors wait to take part in the annual race on high heels during Gay Pride celebrations in the quarter of Chueca in Madrid, Spain, June 30, 2016. REUTERS/Susana Vera TPX IMAGES OF THE DAY      - RTX2J4AJ

Competitors wait to take part in the annual race on high heels during Gay Pride celebrations in Chueca, Madrid, June 30, 2016. REUTERS/Susana Vera

from Tales from the Trail:

Belatedly, what Sanders’ supporters say about race

July 1, 2016

Don’t forget Bernie Sanders!

We learned that the hard way this week after publishing our biggest polling project of the year (so far) on racial attitudes among Americans. The poll, which ran over three months and included interviews with more than 16,000 people, found that Donald Trump supporters were more likely to describe blacks negatively, relative to whites, when compared with people who backed fellow Republicans Ted Cruz and John Kasich or Democratic candidate Hillary Clinton.

from India Insight:

Movie Review: Shorgul

July 1, 2016

Handout Photo: Actors Hiten Tejwani and Suha Gexen in "Shorgul"

Handout Photo: Actors Hiten Tejwani and Suha Gexen in "Shorgul"

(Any opinions expressed here are those of the author and not of Thomson Reuters)

from Reuters News Now:

Friday Morning Briefing: Autopilot fail

July 1, 2016

A driver of a Tesla Model S was killed in an accident while using the car's Autopilot mode, prompting a government investigation of 25,000 Tesla cars using the nascent technology. It's the first known death to involve a Model S operating on Autopilot (the company's name for its software). On a clear day on May 7, a tractor trailer made a left-hand turn in front of 40-year-old Joshua Brown's Model S. "Neither Autopilot nor the driver noticed the white side of the tractor against a brightly lit sky, so the brake was not applied," Tesla said in a blog post. Tesla disclosed the investigation yesterday.

from Breakingviews:

London’s divorce from wider UK can only go so far

July 1, 2016

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist.  The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

Japan’s chat app IPO is more Twitter than WeChat

July 1, 2016

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own.

from Keeping Score:

Under Armour emulates Nike at Rio Olympics

June 30, 2016

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Athletic apparel brand Under Armour is taking advantage of a new rule to conduct guerrilla marketing at the summer Olympics, following in the footsteps of rival Nike. Plus, another golfer takes a pass on the games due to Zika, and talking golf and tennis with a tennis hall of famer who had a role with a PGA Tour stop. A packed show on this week’s Keeping Score with Rick Horrow.

from Alison Frankel:

‘Glaring’ conflict doomed $7.25 billion Visa/MasterCard settlement

June 30, 2016

The biggest money-damages antitrust settlement in U.S. history died Thursday at the 2nd U.S. Court of Appeals. Not because of last year's scandal surrounding leaks to a onetime MasterCard lawyer since charged with fraud, but because the agreement between credit card giants MasterCard, Visa and the merchants suing them for inflating certain fees was fundamentally unfair to some of the retailers.