from The Great Debate:

Why we love Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson is in the doghouse

By Thomas Bender
November 6, 2015


Daveed Diggs as Thomas Jefferson (L) and Lin-Manuel Miranda as Alexander Hamilton (L) debate policy during a cabinet meeting in “Hamilton.” President George Washington (Christopher Jackson) (C) sits behind them. Courtesy of “HAMILTON”/Joan Marcus

from The Great Debate:

Why Donald Trump wants to hike taxes on hedge-fund billionaires

By Benjamin C. Waterhouse
September 10, 2015

Trump gestures next to an architectural rendering of The Trump Organization's redevelopment of the iconic Old Post Office building into a luxury hotel, in Washington

Donald Trump with an architectural rendering of the Trump Organization's redevelopment of the Old Post Office building into a hotel, in Washington, September 10, 2013. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

from The Great Debate:

Why socialist Bernie Sanders may just shake up the 2016 presidential race

By Robert L. Borosage
May 7, 2015

U.S. Senator Sanders holds news conference after announcing his candidacy for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, on Capitol Hill in Washington

Senator Bernie Sanders after he announced his candidacy for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination, on Capitol Hill in Washington, April 30, 2015. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

from The Great Debate:

Republicans talk about inequality. But how serious are they?

By Bill Schneider
January 20, 2015

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, House Speaker John Boehner, Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell stand at a ceremony to posthumously present the Congressional Gold Medal to Raoul Wallenberg in Washington

President Barack Obama is laying down his marker Tuesday with his State of the Union Address. He told a closed-door meeting of Senate Democrats last week, “I'm not going to spend the next two years on defense. I'm going to play offense.”

from Lawrence Summers:

Inequality is about more than money

By Lawrence Summers
June 9, 2014

Graduates from Columbia University's School of Business hold a sign as they cheer during university's commencement ceremony in New York

With Thomas Piketty’s book, Capital in the 21st Century, rising to number 1 on best-seller lists, inequality has become central to the public debate over economic policy. Piketty, and much of this discussion, focuses on the sharp increases in the share of income and wealth going to the top 1 percent, .1 percent and .01 percent of the population.

from Nicholas Wapshott:

The surprise success of Thomas Piketty

By Nicholas Wapshott
April 30, 2014

The surprise success of the French economist Thomas Piketty’s income disparity blockbuster Capital in the 21st Century has forced battlelines to be drawn in the world of political economics.

from The Great Debate:

‘Rentiers’ are at root of 1 percent

By Charles R. Morris
March 12, 2014

The American public is catching on that almost all the benefits from the still-fragile U.S. recovery have gone to the top 1 percent of earners. One sign is that “inequality” has suddenly become a fighting word. Legendary venture capitalist Tom Perkins recently denounced the “demonization” of the rich -- and was quickly forced to apologize for comparing it to Kristallnacht.

from The Great Debate:

The middle class’s missing $1.6 trillion

By Charles R. Morris
February 13, 2014

The United States was the world’s first middle-class nation, which was a big factor in its rapid growth.  Mid-19th-century British travelers marveled at American workers’ “ductility of mind and the readiness…for a new thing” and admired how hard and willingly they labored. Abraham Lincoln attributed it the knowledge that “humblest man [had] an equal chance to get rich with everyone else.”

from The Great Debate:

Populism: The Democrats’ great divide

By Robert L. Borosage
February 5, 2014

One day after President Barack Obama called for moving forward on trade authority in his State of the Union address, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) declared, “I am against fast track,” and said he had no intention of bringing it to a vote in the Senate.

from The Great Debate:

Obama’s small steps won’t fix inequality

By Helaine Olen
January 30, 2014

President Barack Obama is taking on the challenge of increasing the United States’ all but stagnant economic mobility.