from Global Investing:

Record year for global bond markets in 2012

January 3, 2013

How good was 2012 for bond markets? Very good, by the look of the many records broken.

from Ian Bremmer:

The three 2012 themes that matter most

By Ian Bremmer
December 27, 2012

2012 - the year of the primary, the election, the Diamond Jubilee, the superstorm, the flying dictator, the escaped dissident, the embassy attack, the empty chair, the tech protest, the Olympics, and dozens of other stories already forgotten. It was a busy year and a terribly volatile one, too. Which of these stories will actually matter five years from now? By my count, three:

from The Edgy Optimist:

How conspiracy theorists want to steer us towards the cliff

By Zachary Karabell
December 6, 2012

Consumers are feeling optimistic; sales are up; employment hasn’t much improved but neither is it getting worse; Washington is as dysfunctional as ever; and housing is showing significant life. Not the best of times, by any means, but not the worst. Yet, for some, that very calm says a storm is brewing, one of epic and perhaps even biblical proportions. Their opinion may not be a dominant chord, but it is prominent. And it may explain in part why our public debate about fiscal cliffs, taxes and the economic future can verge so quickly into dark, deep and destructive passions.

from The Edgy Optimist:

When did America get so pessimistic?

By Zachary Karabell
November 15, 2012

Barely had the counting ceased in last week’s presidential election when the news took a somber turn. Two of the next day’s headlines read “Back to Work, Looming Fiscal Crisis Greets Obama” and my favorite, “America has Sown the Seeds of Its Own Demise.” Politicians either celebrated or decried the results, but regardless of party affiliation most warned of formidable challenges and a perilous future.

from Anatole Kaletsky:

An optimistic vision of Obama’s second term

By Anatole Kaletsky
November 7, 2012

President Barack Obama’s re-election is good news for the world economy and financial markets. Of course a victory by Mitt Romney, unlikely though it was, might have been even better news, which is perhaps why stock markets fell sharply after the election. If Romney had won, his promised tax cuts and willingness to ignore budget deficits would have delivered a big stimulus to the U.S. economy and triggered a potential boom. But even without this fiscal boost, recent U.S. economic indicators, especially on housing, employment and bank lending, have pointed clearly in the right direction – and now there is every reason to expect these positive trends to accelerate.

from Ian Bremmer:

Rocking the vote may not rock the boat

By Ian Bremmer
November 6, 2012

This week -- chads willing -- Americans will finally put an end to four years’ worth of electoral Sturm und Drang. Only then can the country begin to ask the question that matters much more than who will win: Will anything change? On foreign policy, it’s increasingly clear that the answer is, for the most part, no.

from Lawrence Summers:

The ‘Obama debt’ fallacy

By Lawrence Summers
November 5, 2012

Writing on behalf of the Romney campaign, my friend Mike Boskin has responded to my column from last week that argued that in a number of areas of economic policy, President Obama has the superior vision. Boskin condemns what he refers to as “Obama debt” and argues that Governor Romney has a better plan that he asserts offers "a superior alternative of balanced budgets.” While I was not writing on behalf of the Obama campaign and my piece had a much broader focus than budget deficits, several responses are appropriate.

from Photographers' Blog:

Chasing Obama

October 31, 2012

By Jason Reed

What a difference four years makes for someone running again for President of the United States.

from Lawrence Summers:

This election, Obama is the wiser economic choice

By Lawrence Summers
October 29, 2012

Even as our politicians disagree on a great deal, most experts can agree on the objectives of economic policy. The next president will not have succeeded in the economic area unless he accomplishes three things:

from The Great Debate:

May the odds be ever in your favor

By Chadwick Matlin
October 24, 2012

Editor's note: This piece was originally written for Tomorrow Magazine, whose first issue comes out this month. The article is being republished with permission.