from Breakingviews:

Publicis overpays with $3.7 bln digital takeover

November 3, 2014

By Quentin Webb

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

from Breakingviews:

NFL only understands hits where they really hurt

September 19, 2014

By Jeffrey Goldfarb

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

from The Great Debate UK:

Help, I want my email back…

April 15, 2014

The web-based Heartbleed bug has dominated discussions about online security in recent days. We’ve been told to change passwords, and if you were a regular user of Mumsnet then you’ve probably had your data stolen, the forum said in a message earlier this week. While I was reading all of these articles not once did I think to actually change any of my passwords. This is not because I think that I am immune to Heartbleed and its evil ways, but rather I don’t think the data this super bug could steal from me would be of much use to anybody.

from Jack Shafer:

It’s an ad, ad, ad, ad world

By Jack Shafer
March 13, 2014

The last place you'd expect to discover a map to navigate the future of the content-advertising landscape would be a book about the golden age of radio. But damn it all to hell, there it is on the concluding 12 pages of Cynthia B. Meyers' new book, A Word From Our Sponsor: Admen, Advertising, and the Golden Age of Radio.

from Jack Shafer:

What’s worse than sponsored content? The FTC regulating it

By Jack Shafer
December 6, 2013

What's more dangerous to consumer well-being, sponsored content or the intervention of the Federal Trade Commission? On Wednesday, the agency held a conference, "Blurred Lines: Advertising or Content," to "discuss native advertising," as the New York Times put it. The event attracted several hundred "advertisers, academics and media executives," who listened to the agency's views about native advertising -- or sponsored content, infomercial, or advertorial, as some call it -- those Web ads that are designed to look like editorial content, not ads.

from Jack Shafer:

News never made money, and is unlikely to

By Jack Shafer
August 15, 2013

Sometime in the mid-1990s, the Web began to peel from the daily American newspaper bundle its most commercial elements, essentially the editorial sections against which advertisements could be reliably sold. Coverage of sports, business and market news, entertainment and culture, gossip, shopping, and travel still ran in daily newspapers, but the audience steadily shifted to Web sources for this sort of news. Broadcasters had dented newspaper hegemony decades ago, absconding with breaking news and weather coverage, and inventing new audience pleasers, such as traffic reports and talk. But it was the Web that completed the disintegration of the newspaper bundle that dominated the news media market for more than a century. In addition to pinching the most commercial coverage from newspapers, the Web has also made off with the institution's lucrative classified ads market, simultaneously reducing its status as the premier venue for content and advertising.

from Breakingviews:

Facebook mobilizes back to square one

July 31, 2013

By Richard Beales
The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own. 

from Breakingviews:

“Equality” in Big Ad merger may be hard to sustain

July 29, 2013

By Chris Hughes and Quentin Webb

The authors are Reuters Breakingviews columnists. The opinions expressed are their own.

from MediaFile:

On Twitter, dubious health claims from e-cigarette bots

June 27, 2013

Advertising is a funny medium. TV spots, radio jingles, banner ads -- none of these are meant to get us to rise out of our seats and run to the store. Instead, most advertising is meant to impress something upon us: an idea, a favorable opinion, a subtle memory of a brand name. As social media has gotten more sophisticated, however, a funny thing appears to have happened online: People with products to sell aren’t even bothering to call themselves advertisers.

from Global Investing:

It’s all adding up – emerging markets to drive global spending

May 3, 2013

The world's leading ad agencies are positioning themselves  in Brazil, Russia and China -- countries that are expected to provide almost a third of the growth in global advertising over the next three years. That's according to a report by S&P Capital IQ Equity Research, a unit of publishing giant McGraw Hill.