from Tales from the Trail:

Washington Extra – Combat ready?

February 2, 2012

The Obama administration is known to be methodical when it comes to its messaging. But Defense Secretary Leon Panetta's declaration that the U.S. combat mission in Afghanistan might end next year seems to have caught people here and overseas by surprise.

from Expert Zone:

Gains seen for Taliban as post-ISAF era looms in Afghanistan

By S K Chatterji
January 25, 2012

(The views expressed in this column are the author's own and do not represent those of Reuters)

from Photographers' Blog:

Afghanistan’s symphony

January 13, 2012

By Omar Sobhani

Usually when I go to shoot for a story, we are faced with a bomb blast, a suicide attack, or some other type of violence here in Afghanistan. That's why I was pleasantly surprised when I visited Afghanistan’s National Institute of Music. Even though I have lived in Kabul for many years, I had no clue this academy even existed -- it is the only of its kind in the whole country.

from David Rohde:

Talk to the Taliban

By David Rohde
January 12, 2012

WASHINGTON -- As American officials scramble to contain the fallout from an appalling video showing Marines urinating on dead Taliban fighters, news that the Obama administration is carrying out secret negotiations with the Taliban has barely registered on the American political landscape. The lack of interest in the talks - and public outrage at the video - reflects how little Americans apparently care about the conflict, despite its staggering human and fiscal cost.

from Photographers' Blog:

The essence of war

January 11, 2012

By Umit Bektas

As the medical staff rushed to prepare the seriously wounded soldier for immediate surgery, I stood in one corner of the emergency room wondering how publishable the pictures I would take of this bloody and violent scene would be and what would be the benefit of it, if they were indeed published.

from Photographers' Blog:

Are you ready for your embed?

December 20, 2011

By Umit Bektas

When I was informed of the date from which I was to be embedded with a U.S. military unit in Afghanistan, I luckily had enough time to prepare. I felt I had to plan everything before I left so I drew up a "to do" list. A major item on the list was the packing of my bags.

from Afghan Journal:

India-Afghan strategic pact:the beginnings of regional integration

November 11, 2011

A strategic partnership agreement between India and Afghanistan would ordinarily have evoked howls of protest from Pakistan which has long regarded its western neighbour as part of its sphere of influence.  Islamabad has, in the past, made no secret of its displeasure at India's role in Afghanistan including  a$2 billion aid effort that has won it goodwill among the Afghan  people, but which Pakistan sees as New Delhi's way to expand influence. 

from Photographers' Blog:

A country a day with Hillary Clinton

November 3, 2011

By Kevin Lamarque

Traveling with Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, covering seven countries in seven days (Malta, Libya, Oman, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan) was sure to present some challenges, but also offer some fresh perspectives. My usual beat, covering Obama at the White House and on his trips abroad, generally involves lots of pushing and shoving with other photographers behind velvet ropes or trying to get a clear photo through layers upon layers of secret service agents. I was welcoming a chance to be free of these constraints in the more low key State Department bubble.

from David Rohde:

Looking to Afghanistan’s future

By David Rohde
October 7, 2011

As the 10th anniversary of the start of the Afghan war is marked around the world, looking forward is more important than looking back. As I noted in an earlier post, staggering mistakes have been made over the last decade. While individual Americans and Afghans have performed heroically, the Afghan and American governments – particularly their civilian arms – have performed anemically. And Pakistan’s intelligence service - the ISI - is the single largest impediment to stability in the region.

from Photographers' Blog:

38 days and 10 years in Afghanistan

October 7, 2011

By Erik de Castro

As I write this blog, I am on the 38th day of my current assignment to Afghanistan as an embedded journalist with U.S. military forces. I have been assigned here several times since 2001 to cover the war that is still going on 10 years after the al Qaeda attack on U.S. soil. Mullah Omar, popularly known as the one-eyed Taliban, was the first member of the Taliban I met back in 2001. He held press conferences almost daily at the Afghan embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan a few weeks before U.S. forces and its allies attacked Afghanistan to remove the Taliban government.