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from Africa News blog:

How will Zuma’s resumed court battle affect South Africa?

Jacob Zuma, the embattled leader of South Africa's ruling African National Congress (ANC) launched a big fight for his political life on Aug. 4, asking the  Pietermaritzburg High Court to dismiss a graft case against him that could stop him becoming president next year. If his application is rejected, a full corruption trial could follow later this year and South Africa could head into a protracted period of tension and uncertainty. Read the following insights from leading analysts and have your say on how the legal process could affect South Africa:

gottschalk_resized1.jpegKeith Gottschalk, the University of the Western Cape (see full analysis)

"Jacob Zuma's Zuma's legal team has already proved, year after year that, if you have a bottomless pocket such as taxpayers, you can protract litigation, U.S.-style for the better part of a decade."

taljaard_resized1.jpgRainette Taljaard, Helen Suzman Foundation (see full analysis)

"If the arms deal was the loss of innocence for South African's ruling party, the Zuma trial will be the collateral damage to constitutional structures with long-term consequences."

adenaan_resized1.JPGAdenaan Hardien, Cadiz (see full analysis)

"If anything is giving market participants sleepless nights, then it has to be what Reserve Bank Governor Tito Mboweni and his Monetary Policy Committee will decide when they meet next week."

from Africa News blog:

No quick end seen in Zuma case

Keith Gottschalk, The University of the Western Cape

gottschalk_resized.jpegJacob Zuma's legal team has already proved, year after year that, if you have a bottomless pocket such as taxpayers, you can protract litigation, U.S.-style for the better part of a decade.

    The Presidency currently has a line item budget of 10 million rand per year for Zuma's legal expenses. By South African standards, this is a record. It will certainly enable his legal team to appeal every point of procedure, then if necessary the verdict, and sentence. Each appeal starts with a delay of six or nine months on the court rolls, repeated as it winds it way upwards through a full bench of the High Court, followed by the Supreme Court of Appeal, followed by the Constitutional Court.

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