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from MacroScope:

A dissenting voice

A train carrying the remains of the victims of Malaysia Airlines MH17 arrives in Kharkiv

Interesting intervention from former Russian finance minister Alexei Kudrin late yesterday who warned that Russia risked isolation and having its efforts to modernize derailed.

That sort of internal criticism is rare but Kudrin has done so before without censure which suggests Vladimir Putin is – or has been - willing to hear it. Kudrin added that Moscow should not intervene militarily in eastern Ukraine.

EU foreign ministers came up with more promises of tougher action against Russia without quite showing the colour of their money. Meeting in Brussels they discussed restricting Russian access to European capital markets, defence and energy technology, asking the executive European Commission to draft proposals this week.

They also agreed to widen the list of people and companies to be targeted by asset freezes and travel bans and some called for an arms embargo but at the same time President Francois Hollande said delivery of a first French helicopter carrier built for Russia would go ahead.

from MacroScope:

Fed and BoE to markets: pay attention to pay

A bookie holds a wad of cash on the third day of the Cheltenham Festival horse racing meetingIt is more than a bit ironic that those paid the most to pay attention to incoming data aren’t paying enough attention to pay.

Both Bank of England Governor Mark Carney and Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen have dropped many hints in speeches and public policy statements over the past several months that wage inflation likely will play an important role in any decision to raise interest rates.

from MacroScope:

New EU takes shape

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The new EU aristocracy will be put in place this week with the European Parliament to confirm Jean-Claude Juncker as the next European Commission President today and then EU leaders gathering for a summit on Wednesday at which they will work out who gets the other top jobs in Brussels.

Although Juncker, who will make a statement to the parliament today which may shed some light on his policy priorities, is supposed to decide the 27 commissioner posts – one for each country – in reality this will be an almighty horse-trading operation.

from MacroScope:

Bank of England, the first mover?

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After the European Central Bank kept alive the prospect of printing money and the U.S. economy enjoyed a bumper month of jobs hiring prompting some to bring forward their expectations for a first U.S. interest rate rise, the Bank of England holds a monthly policy meeting.

There is no chance of a rate rise this time but the UK looks increasingly nailed on to be the first major economy to tighten policy, with the ECB heading in the opposite direction and the U.S. Federal Reserve still unlikely to shift until well into next year. Minutes of the Fed’s last meeting, released yesterday, showed general agreement that its QE programme would end in October but gave little sign that rates will rise before the middle of 2015.

from Breakingviews:

Don’t believe predictions of low interest rates

By Edward Hadas

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are his own.

Will the new normal for interest rates be lower than the old? It is rapidly becoming conventional wisdom that years of near-zero overnight rates will be succeeded by an indefinite period in which borrowing costs remain low by the standards of the last few decades. The new consensus is reflected in financial markets: the yield on 30-year U.S. Treasury bonds has fallen from 4 percent to 3.4 percent this year. But it is built on unsound foundations.

from MacroScope:

Key to UK interest rate hike, pay data, still a muddle

gateway[2]

Bank of England rate setters meeting this week should be in cordial agreement that Britain's economy is growing at a decent pace, and that price pressures look mostly in check at the moment.

But when it comes to gauging how quickly slack in the labour market is disappearing – a key question deciding when they should raise interest rates – the surveys look a lot less joined-up.

from The Great Debate UK:

Could Mark Carney learn a thing or two from Luis Suarez?

Bank of England Governor Mark Carney smiles as he waits deliver a public speech "One Mission. One Bank. Promoting the good of the people of the United Kingdom" at the Cass Business School in London, March 18, 2014. REUTERS/Sang Tan/Pool

Uruguay's Luis Suarez (R) reacts after clashing with Italy's Giorgio Chiellini during their 2014 World Cup Group D soccer match at the Dunas arena in Natal June 24, 2014.  REUTERS/Tony Gentile

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In the aftermath of Liverpool and Uruguay footballer Luis Suarez biting an opponent yet again, and with such aggression that he scarred the player's arm and hurt his own teeth, FIFA has banned him for nine games, and psychologists are trying to justify his behaviour by saying that Suarez must have been humiliated and frustrated in his youth. I, in contrast, am asking whether Mark Carney and co. should learn to be a little more like Suarez?

Let me make this clear, I am not advocating that members of the Bank of England's Monetary Policy Committee give each other a good bite if they disagree on policy (imagine the bite marks at the ECB if that was socially acceptable), but they should metaphorically pull a few Suarez’s from time to time.

from MacroScope:

Bank of England Minutes give rate debate another twist

 

carney.jpgSpeculation about when the Bank of England hikes interest rates took a new twist on Wednesday after minutes from the June policy meeting struck a less hawkish tone than the Governor did in a speech late last week.

Mark Carney caused a few shockwaves last week when he said rates could rise sooner than expected, sending sterling above $1.70 to a near five-year high

from Breakingviews:

Can sterling hit $2? Only with a perfect storm

By Swaha Pattanaik

The author is a Reuters Breakingviews columnist. The opinions expressed are her own. 

Sterling has touched $1.70 and is on the brink of bursting ranges which have confined it for five years. Could a resurgent pound return to pre-crisis levels of $2?

from MacroScope:

Of Iraq and Ukraine

Barack Obama’s message that any military support for Iraq’s besieged government is contingent on Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki taking steps to broaden his Shi'ite-dominated government may be having an impact.

Just hours after Maliki's Shi'ite allies vowed to boycott any cooperation with the biggest Sunni party and his government had accused Sunni neighbour Saudi Arabia of backing "genocide", Maliki broadcast a joint appeal for national unity alongside Sunni critics of his Shi'ite-led government.

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