Archive

Reuters blog archive

from Photographers' Blog:

Escaping to the Gaza shore

Gaza City

By Mohammed Salem

Growing up in Gaza City, I used to go to the sea with my family in the summer time, escaping the heat of Sheikh Rudwan neighborhood where we lived.

The sea has always been our refuge from the difficult day-to-day life in the Gaza Strip. Like many youths in Gaza, home to 1.8 million people, I rarely left my town before I joined Reuters. A visit to the beach, a swim in the sea or a picnic with my friends was the best form of enjoyment we could have.

GALLERY: THE GAZA SHORE

After I became a photographer I discovered many new faces to life next to the sea. I took notice of those whose lives were dependent on fishing and the limitations imposed by Israel that they needed to cope with. I have joined fishermen on their trips to the sea, and spent many hours with them. I saw their dismay when they lost a catch, and their disappointment when they faced an empty net after a long journey. I was also witness to their joy when they made good catches on lucky days. I recall one time I saw the most sincere smiles I have ever seen on the faces of some fishermen returning from a successful expedition.

I also recall some painful memories from the sea. Before Israel withdrew from the Gaza Strip in 2005 large areas along the beach were off limits because of the Jewish settlements. Several times I covered confrontations between the Palestinian residents of these areas and Israeli forces.

from Photographers' Blog:

Beachside at Blackpool

Blackpool, Northern England

By Phil Noble

I can remember vividly as a child trailing after several suitcases pulled by my parents or trying to squeeze into my uncle's luggage-laden car as my brother and I began the journey to our annual family holiday by the beach.

This was the late 1970s or early 1980s, and foreign holidays were out of the reach of the Noble household at that point, so the bright lights of a British resort such as Llandudno or Blackpool was our usual destination.

from Photographers' Blog:

Spilling oil in Paradise

Ao Prao Beach, Thailand

By Athit Perawongmetha

I first met Piyapong Sopakhon on Coconut Bay on Samet island. He was surrounded by men in white bio-hazard suits and he stuck out because he was a young boy wearing a simple plastic sheet that protected his small body as well as orange dish-washing gloves that were too big for his small hands. It was as though he had opened up a chest of dress-up clothes and was getting ready for fun -- but  matter at hand was not child’s play -- the gloves were covered in a thick goo of the black gobs that were smeared across the beach -- a toxic spread on golden buttered toast.

Piyapong is not a soldier nor is he a marine biologist. He's just a school boy who, on any other day, would have been told off for skipping class. So I asked him: "Why aren't you in school today?" His reply? “I just want to help.”

from Photographers' Blog:

When tragedy turns to joy

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

By Sergio Moraes

I never imagined to find so many tragic stories that end with joy, until I discovered the project called “Praia para Todos", or "Beach for Everyone." The project, sponsored by the NGO Instituto Novo Ser in Rio, offers recreation and sport to the physically handicapped on Saturdays at Barra da Tijuca beach, and on Sundays at Copacabana. The project is run by physical therapists and students, all of them volunteers. They built ramps on top of the sand so that wheelchairs could easily reach the water’s edge.

In my first contact with the organizers, I asked for help to meet some of the visitors so that I could follow their personal stories. The first one I spoke to was Patricia Alves de Souza, 41, the mother of an incredible boy named Jorge, or Jorginho. Jorginho, 11, was born prematurely with brain paralysis. Jorginho is crazy about soccer, and doesn’t tire of telling stories about his favorite team, Vasco da Gama. He knows everything about Vasco.

from Photographers' Blog:

Five stars or no stars, life is a beach

By Desmond Boylan

The variety of options and price range for vacationing in Cuba, for either Cubans or foreigners, is vast. Let’s take the average Cuban family, with an income of roughly $20 (500 pesos) per month from the husband and around $10 from the wife. Summer comes and they need a break with their two children.

SLIDESHOW: BEACHSIDE CUBA

For the equivalent of $5 (120 pesos), this family can have a short, three-day break in a popular campismo, or rural cabin for four people in a natural park or near the sea, with round trip transportation included. Conditions are spartan and unsophisticated, but clean and agreeable. Obviously the Cuban state is not making a profit on this and subsidizes the cost to make it possible for average people to enjoy a holiday. Average still means the vast majority of Cubans, as in this communist economy there are still few incomes above or below the mean.

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Beach Blanket? Bingo!

Blog Guy, summer is almost here, and once again we're faced with that annual problem. You know the one.  

You put on an unsightly 200 pounds over the winter and you're embarrassed to be seen in a swimsuit?

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Unveiling the Rube Tube

Okay marketing staff, times are hard. People aren't buying enough of our regular fashions, so we have to invent NEW articles of clothing and create a demand.

BRAZIL/Now have a look at this brand-new thing here, for guys.

It's like the opposite of a tube top. It covers your abdomen, but shows off your chest. It's like a shirt, only different.

from Tales from the Trail:

Obama Hawaiian Vacation: Beach Day

If it's Sunday in Hawaii, it must be beach day. Actually if it's any day in Hawaii, it's beach day.

OBAMA/But for President Barack Obama Sunday was the first day for a real  beach outing since he arrived in Kailua for the presidential Christmas break last Thursday.

from Your View:

Dry Fishes

Small fishes were kept for drying which can be used later for eating in Marina beach, Tamilnadu, India.   Your View/Ravi Kumar

from Oddly Enough Blog:

Presenting the butt-naked diet?

People often say to me, "Bob, how do you stay so thin?"

Of course they're just being sarcastic and cruel, but it happens I am on an unusual diet these days, and expect to be ready for a Cape Cod beach vacation by November.

My secret? I've gone on the "Live with saggy naked people diet."

It's easy. You just live for a few weeks in a resort for "naturists," which is what wrinkly naked people call themselves these days, and you go where they go.

  •